Phoenix Arizona


ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY News Release by azhttp

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY News Release

January 28, 2008

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY JOINS LARGEST TEACH-IN IN U.S. HISTORY
Thousands of campuses help focus nation on global-warming solutions

TEMPE, Ariz. — On Jan. 30 and 31, 2008, Arizona State University (ASU) will participate in Focus The Nation, an unprecedented teach-in on global-warming solutions.

Focus The Nation has created a teach-in model centered on the three most essential pillars needed to embrace solutions to global warming — education, civic engagement and leadership.

“Today’s college students are truly the greatest generation,” said Lewis & Clark professor of economics Eban Goodstein, author and project director for Focus The Nation. “No other generation has ever had to face this kind of challenge. We as educators would be failing if we did not prepare them with the tools to meet this challenge.”

“Arizona State University is delighted to take part in Focus the Nation,” said ASU President Michael Crow. “All of these efforts represent education at its finest. Our students have enormous power to use their education and passion to create positive change in the world.”

Focus the Nation activities at ASU include a pre-recorded web cast of the “The Two Percent Solution,” produced by the National Wildlife Federation. The web cast (which will be held at 6 p.m., Jan. 30) includes a four-minute segment on ASU’s School of Sustainability, the first school of its kind in the nation. The four-minute video will showcase what ASU is doing on Focus the Nation day and tell the larger story about sustainability at ASU.

The segment will come after a focused discussion about the “The Two Percent Solution” (reducing carbon emissions two percent every year to reach an 80 percent reduction by 2050), led by actor Edward Norton, climate scientist Steve Schneider, author Hunter Lovins (CEO, Natural Capitalism) and environmental justice leader Van Jones (executive director, Ella Baker Center, Oakland, Calif.)

The next day, Jan. 31, will include a range of global warming curricula presented by faculty members and guest speakers, flashlight tours at the Nelson Fine Arts Center, followed by a festival on Hayden Lawn from 11:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. Student groups will host interactive activities, continuous viewings of “The Two Percent Solution” and the ASU video, and hear the “recycled” of The Sustainabillies band.

As a key part of Focus the Nation, students, faculty and staff will participate in the Choose Your Future vote and select what they think are the top five solutions for global warming. Participants can vote online (www.focusthenation.org ) or at the event. Voting results will be presented nationally to congressional offices on Feb. 18. All students who vote on the Choose Your Future ballot will be eligible to win a $10,000 leadership scholarship for a project to be completed by end of August 2008.

For more information on ASU’s Focus The Nation events, visit http://schoolofsustainability.asu.edu/events/focus2008.php.

# # #

Focus The Nation is an educational initiative on global warming solutions for America occurring at more than 1,000 universities and colleges and in all 50 states on Jan. 31, 2008. As the largest teach-in in U.S. history, Focus The Nation is preparing millions of students to become leaders in the largest challenge any generation has faced. For more information, visit http://www.focusthenation.org .

Contacts:
Lauren Kuby, ASU, (480) 730-8457
Lauren.Kuby@asu.edu
Garett Reiss Brennan, Focus the Nation, (503) 768-7990
garett@focusthenation.org

Skip Derra
National Media Relations Officer/Science Writer
Arizona State University
Media Relations
(480) 965-4823
(480) 965-2159 (fax)
skip.derra@asu.edu

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Tickets become available for Orbison, Childsplay, Clinton by quotes

Tickets become available for Orbison, Childsplay, Clinton

TEMPE, Ariz. – Tickets for the Roy Orbison tribute and the Childsplay and Kate Clinton performances at the Tempe Center for the Arts will become available in the next two weeks.

* Roy Orbison Weekend – all events are free; tickets are required.

Tickets for the film screening of “Roadie” and the Roy Orbison Tribute Concert go on sale at 10 a.m. on Jan. 8. Tickets can be reserved in person at the TCA box office, 700 W. Rio Salado Parkway, or by calling 480/350-2TCA (2822). No online reservations are being accepted.

The film “Roadie” (1980) features the music of Roy Orbison and begins at

8 p.m. on Jan. 24 in the TCA Theater. The Truly Lover Trio will perform songs by Orbison, and the Herberger String Quartet performs Kim Scharnberg’s world premiere of “Suite on Tunes by Roy Orbison” at 8 p.m.

on Jan. 25 in the TCA Theater.

Both events are presented by the city of Tempe, the Tempe Center for the Arts and Arizona State University’s Center for Film, Media and Popular Culture

The following performances may be purchased in person or by visiting http://www.tempe.gov/TCA/ or calling 480/350-2TCA (2822). * Childsplay performances

Tickets for “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day,” “In My Grandmother’s Purse” and “A Little Bit of Water” will go on sale at 10 a.m. on Jan. 11.

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

April 27-May 25

Tickets range from $12-$25, not including service or convenience fees

In My Grandmother’s Purse

June 7-14

Tickets are $12-$18, not including service or convenience fees

A Little Bit of Water

June 15-22, 2008

Tickets are $12-$18, not including service or convenience fees

*Equality Arizona presents Kate Clinton: “Hilarity Clinton”

7:30 p.m., March 21

Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. on Jan. 16.

Tickets range from $25-$50, not including service or convenience fees



Get Involved! session scheduled at museum by quotes

Get Involved! session scheduled at museum

TEMPE, Ariz. – The public is invited to enjoy a cup of coffee and learn about becomming an Historical Museum volunteer at 9 a.m. on Tuesday (Jan. 8) at the Tempe Historical Museum, 809 E. Southern Ave.

This hour-long session will cover the background and purpose of the museum with a brief tour of the facility. Explore how you can play a role in preserving community history.

Information: 480-350-5190.



Tempe offers Christmas tree disposal drop-off sites by azhttp

TEMPE, Ariz. – When the holidays are over and decorations are tucked back

into storage, Tempe residents have handy options for disposing of their

Christmas trees – which should not be placed in garbage containers. Trees

can be dropped off from 7 a.m. to noon on Fridays and from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.

on Saturdays at the city’s Household Products Collection Center, 1320 E.

University Dr. Additionally, trees can be dropped off at the parking lot

west of Kiwanis Park Recreation Center,

6111 W. All-America Way, 24 hours, seven days a week. Both sites will accept

trees through Jan. 20. The city also collects trees during normal monthly

collection for brush and bulky items. Visit

www.tempe.gov/recycling/uncontainedschedule.pdf to find out when your

neighborhood is scheduled for monthly collection. For information, call

480-350-8265.



NANOTECH’S HEALTH, ENVIRONMENT IMPACTS WORRY SCIENTISTS by azhttp

TEMPE, Ariz. — The unknown human health and environmental impacts of nanotechnology are a bigger worry for scientists than for the public, according to a new report published on line (November 25, 2007) in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.
 
The report was based on a national telephone survey of American households and a sampling of 363 leading U.S. nanotechnology scientists and engineers. It reveals that those with the most insight into a technology with enormous potential — and that is already emerging in hundreds of products — are unsure what health and environmental problems might be posed by the technology.
 
Two Arizona State University researchers – Elizabeth Corley, an assistant professor in the School of Public Affairs, and David Guston, director of the Center for Nanotechnology in Society and a professor of political science, are co-authors of the paper.
 
“It’s unusual for experts to see a greater risk in new technologies than for the public at large,” Guston said. “But these findings do not mean that scientists are saying that there is a problem.”
 
“Scientists are saying, ‘we don’t know,” explained the study’s lead author Dietram Scheufele, a University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of life sciences communication and journalism. “The research hasn’t been done.’”
 
The new findings are in stark contrast to controversies sparked by the advent of major technologies of the past, such as nuclear power and genetically modified foods, which scientists perceived as having lower risks than did the public.
 
Nanotechnology is based on science’s newfound ability to manipulate matter at the smallest scale, on the order of molecules and atoms. The field has enormous potential to develop applications ranging from new antimicrobial materials and tiny probes to sample individual cells in human patients, to vastly more powerful computers and lasers. Already, products with nanotechnology built in include such things as golf clubs, tennis rackets and antimicrobial food storage containers.
 
At the root of the information disconnect, said Elizabeth Corley, who conducted the survey with Scheufele, is that nanotechnology is only now starting to emerge on the nation’s policy agenda. Amplifying the problem is that the news media have not paid much attention to nanotechnology and its implications.  
 
“In the long run, this information disconnect could undermine public support for federal funding in certain areas of nanotechnology research, particularly in those areas that the public views as having lower levels of risk,” Corley said.            
 
While scientists were generally optimistic about the potential benefits of nanotechnology, they expressed significantly more concern about pollution and new health problems related to the technology. Potential health problems were in fact the highest rated concern among scientists, Guston said.
 
Twenty percent of the scientists responding to the survey indicated a concern that new forms of nanotechnology pollution may emerge, while only 15 percent of the public thought that might be a problem. More than 30 percent of scientists expressed concern that human health may be at risk from the technology, while just 20 percent of the public held such fears.
 
Of more concern to the American public, according to the report, are a potential loss of privacy from tiny new surveillance devices and the loss of more U.S jobs. Those fears were less of a concern for scientists.
 
While scientists wonder about the health and environmental implications of the new technology, their ability to spark public conversation seems to be limited, Corley and Guston said.
 
That’s because “scientists tend to treat communication as an afterthought,” Wisconsin’s Scheufele added. “They’re often not working with social scientists, industry or interest groups to build a channel to the public.”
 
The good news for scientist is that of all sources of nanotechnology information, they are the most trusted by the public.
 
“The public wants to know more about nanotechnology,” Guston added. “That’s why the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at ASU is conducting additional polls of the public and of scientists, and is organizing a National Citizens’ Technology Forum to elicit informed public perspectives on nanotechnology.”
 
“The climate for having that discourse is perfect,” Scheufele added. “There is definitely a huge opportunity for scientists to communicate with a public who trusts them.”
 
In addition to ASU’s Corley and Guston and Wisconsin’s Scheufele, other authors of the Nature Nanotechnology report include Sharon Dunwoody, Tsung-Jen Shih and Elliott Hillback of University of Wisconsin-Madison. The study was funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University and the UW-Madison Graduate School.



Public reception celebrates Animal Instinct by azhttp

TEMPE, Ariz. – The public is invited to a free reception celebrating the

opening of “Animal Instinct,” a family-oriented art exhibition featuring

two- and three-dimensional animal-themed works, from 6:30-7:30 p.m. on Nov.

27 in the Tempe Community Gallery, Lower Level Library, 3500 S.

Rural Road.

Refreshments and cookies will be served, and children will be entertained by

a story time reading about animals.

The Animal Instinct exhibition is on display through Feb. 3 and is a program

of the city of Tempe Cultural Services Division.

Library hours (Closed on city-observed holidays)

9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday-Thursday

9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Friday-Saturday

Noon to 5:30 p.m., Sunday

For information, visit http://www.tempe.gov/arts/exhibitions/Library.htm

or call 480/350-2867.



TEMPE, Ariz. – Model trains, holiday crafts and a visit from Santa Claus by azhttp

Santa, trains highlight annual

Holiday Fantasia festivities

TEMPE, Ariz. – Model trains, holiday crafts and a visit from Santa Claus

highlight the annual Holiday Fantasia event from 1 to 4 p.m. on Dec. 1 at

the Tempe Historical Museum, 809 E. Southern Ave.

This free, public event features holiday trees with lights, decorations from

other time periods and cultures and cookie decorating (and eating).

Children will enjoy art stations with make-n-take art activities, including

traditional Danish paper cutouts by the Danish Immigrant Museum of Elkhorn,

Iowa.

And don’t forget to bring a camera for snapshots. The first 100 families can

take home a free photo with Santa.

Information: 480-350-5100 or www.tempe.gov/museum/.