Phoenix Arizona


NANOTECH’S HEALTH, ENVIRONMENT IMPACTS WORRY SCIENTISTS by azhttp

TEMPE, Ariz. — The unknown human health and environmental impacts of nanotechnology are a bigger worry for scientists than for the public, according to a new report published on line (November 25, 2007) in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.
 
The report was based on a national telephone survey of American households and a sampling of 363 leading U.S. nanotechnology scientists and engineers. It reveals that those with the most insight into a technology with enormous potential — and that is already emerging in hundreds of products — are unsure what health and environmental problems might be posed by the technology.
 
Two Arizona State University researchers – Elizabeth Corley, an assistant professor in the School of Public Affairs, and David Guston, director of the Center for Nanotechnology in Society and a professor of political science, are co-authors of the paper.
 
“It’s unusual for experts to see a greater risk in new technologies than for the public at large,” Guston said. “But these findings do not mean that scientists are saying that there is a problem.”
 
“Scientists are saying, ‘we don’t know,” explained the study’s lead author Dietram Scheufele, a University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of life sciences communication and journalism. “The research hasn’t been done.’”
 
The new findings are in stark contrast to controversies sparked by the advent of major technologies of the past, such as nuclear power and genetically modified foods, which scientists perceived as having lower risks than did the public.
 
Nanotechnology is based on science’s newfound ability to manipulate matter at the smallest scale, on the order of molecules and atoms. The field has enormous potential to develop applications ranging from new antimicrobial materials and tiny probes to sample individual cells in human patients, to vastly more powerful computers and lasers. Already, products with nanotechnology built in include such things as golf clubs, tennis rackets and antimicrobial food storage containers.
 
At the root of the information disconnect, said Elizabeth Corley, who conducted the survey with Scheufele, is that nanotechnology is only now starting to emerge on the nation’s policy agenda. Amplifying the problem is that the news media have not paid much attention to nanotechnology and its implications.  
 
“In the long run, this information disconnect could undermine public support for federal funding in certain areas of nanotechnology research, particularly in those areas that the public views as having lower levels of risk,” Corley said.            
 
While scientists were generally optimistic about the potential benefits of nanotechnology, they expressed significantly more concern about pollution and new health problems related to the technology. Potential health problems were in fact the highest rated concern among scientists, Guston said.
 
Twenty percent of the scientists responding to the survey indicated a concern that new forms of nanotechnology pollution may emerge, while only 15 percent of the public thought that might be a problem. More than 30 percent of scientists expressed concern that human health may be at risk from the technology, while just 20 percent of the public held such fears.
 
Of more concern to the American public, according to the report, are a potential loss of privacy from tiny new surveillance devices and the loss of more U.S jobs. Those fears were less of a concern for scientists.
 
While scientists wonder about the health and environmental implications of the new technology, their ability to spark public conversation seems to be limited, Corley and Guston said.
 
That’s because “scientists tend to treat communication as an afterthought,” Wisconsin’s Scheufele added. “They’re often not working with social scientists, industry or interest groups to build a channel to the public.”
 
The good news for scientist is that of all sources of nanotechnology information, they are the most trusted by the public.
 
“The public wants to know more about nanotechnology,” Guston added. “That’s why the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at ASU is conducting additional polls of the public and of scientists, and is organizing a National Citizens’ Technology Forum to elicit informed public perspectives on nanotechnology.”
 
“The climate for having that discourse is perfect,” Scheufele added. “There is definitely a huge opportunity for scientists to communicate with a public who trusts them.”
 
In addition to ASU’s Corley and Guston and Wisconsin’s Scheufele, other authors of the Nature Nanotechnology report include Sharon Dunwoody, Tsung-Jen Shih and Elliott Hillback of University of Wisconsin-Madison. The study was funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University and the UW-Madison Graduate School.

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Help for Alzheimer’s Caregivers by azhttp

Help for Alzheimer’s Caregivers

New research by The Hartford Financial Service Group in conjunction with the

MIT Age Lab and Boston University helped to develop “At the Crossroads,” a

new booklet designed to help Alzheimer caregivers make the difficult

decision on when their loved one should stop driving.

You can reach the story directly by going to

http://www.mediaseed.tv/home.aspx?Story=34143



Sparks Fly as American Idol Winner Jordin Sparks Blazes Onto the Music Scene by azhttp

“And the winner of American Idol is … Jordin Sparks!” We all remember when

Ryan Seacrest said those words on the season finale. So, what has the

17-year-old songstress been up to since she won the coveted spot? During the

summer she, along with the rest of the top ten finalists, traveled across

the country for the 56-city Pop Tarts American Idol Live! Tour. In between

shows, Jordin was working hard on her self-titled debut album, which hits

stores on November 20th.

You can reach the story directly by going to

http://www.mediaseed.tv/home.aspx?Story=34139



Public reception celebrates Animal Instinct by azhttp

TEMPE, Ariz. – The public is invited to a free reception celebrating the

opening of “Animal Instinct,” a family-oriented art exhibition featuring

two- and three-dimensional animal-themed works, from 6:30-7:30 p.m. on Nov.

27 in the Tempe Community Gallery, Lower Level Library, 3500 S.

Rural Road.

Refreshments and cookies will be served, and children will be entertained by

a story time reading about animals.

The Animal Instinct exhibition is on display through Feb. 3 and is a program

of the city of Tempe Cultural Services Division.

Library hours (Closed on city-observed holidays)

9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday-Thursday

9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Friday-Saturday

Noon to 5:30 p.m., Sunday

For information, visit http://www.tempe.gov/arts/exhibitions/Library.htm

or call 480/350-2867.



TEMPE, Ariz. – Model trains, holiday crafts and a visit from Santa Claus by azhttp

Santa, trains highlight annual

Holiday Fantasia festivities

TEMPE, Ariz. – Model trains, holiday crafts and a visit from Santa Claus

highlight the annual Holiday Fantasia event from 1 to 4 p.m. on Dec. 1 at

the Tempe Historical Museum, 809 E. Southern Ave.

This free, public event features holiday trees with lights, decorations from

other time periods and cultures and cookie decorating (and eating).

Children will enjoy art stations with make-n-take art activities, including

traditional Danish paper cutouts by the Danish Immigrant Museum of Elkhorn,

Iowa.

And don’t forget to bring a camera for snapshots. The first 100 families can

take home a free photo with Santa.

Information: 480-350-5100 or www.tempe.gov/museum/.



Danish Christmas returns to the Petersen House by azhttp

Danish Christmas returns to the Petersen House

TEMPE, Ariz. – A Danish Christmas returns from Dec. 1 through Jan. 5 at the

Petersen House Museum, 1414 W. Southern Ave. (Northwest corner of Priest

Drive and Southern Avenue.) Admission is free; donations are appreciated.

Annette Andersen, of Kimballton, Iowa, will demonstrate how the Danish do

“papirklip,” translated as paper cuttings from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Dec. 2.

The House’s holiday decorations interpret the Danish Christmas Story,

“Peter’s Christmas,” a story by J. Krohn about a young boy’s Christmas in

Denmark in the late 1800s. It was written about the time Niels Petersen, for

whom the Petersen House is named, immigrated to the United States.

The event is brought to Tempe by the Danish Immigrant Museum of Elkhorn,

Iowa, and the Tempe Historical Museum.

Hours:

10 a.m.-2 p.m., Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday

12:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Dec. 2, 9, 16 and 23 with Peter’s Christmas Story Time

at 1:30 p.m. (light refreshments available)

Tours: Tour reservations will be taken for groups of more than 10 people on

Tuesdays thru Thursdays and Saturdays. Sundays will be open house.

Information:

Tempe Historical Museum, http://www.tempe.gov/museum/

<http://www.tempe.gov/museum/>

Petersen House, http://www.tempe.gov/petersenhouse/

<http://www.tempe.gov/petersenhouse/>

Danish Immigrant Museum, http://dkmuseum.org/ <http://dkmuseum.org/>



Scottsdale a major milestone to ensure long-term sustainability of water resources by azhttp
November 12, 2007, 5:55 am
Filed under: City of Scottsdale | Tags: , , , , ,

Water is the lifeblood of a community and always a top concern of mine. I would like to share Scottsdale’s recent achievement which demonstrates our steadfast commitment to long-term sustainability of our water resources.A major milestone has been achieved by Scottsdale. This past year we recharged as much water into the groundwater aquifers as was pumped out from wells. This balance is called “safe yield” and it ensures the long-term sustainability of the city’s groundwater resources. Several factors contributed to this achievement, including strategic planning and the construction of the Water Campus. Scottsdale recently received the prestigious Crescordia Award for our Aquifer Sustainability Program during Valley Forward’s annual Environmental Awards banquet.

“In 1980 Arizona passed the Groundwater Management Act that set the achievement of “safe yield,” a balance between groundwater withdrawal and artificial/natural recharge, as a goal for Phoenix-area water providers. To achieve “safe yield” Scottsdale had to overcome several challenges – primarily its historic 100 percent dependency on groundwater to supply its drinking water, and secondly, the city’s wells are located on the upper-end of the aquifer, making the community more vulnerable to water-level decline.

Scottsdale implemented an innovative set of water resource management strategies, which culminated in the city’s Aquifer Sustainability Program. Its surface water acquisition program was funded by the first impact fees in the state, developed by Scottsdale, dedicated exclusively toward water supply acquisition. The city now receives approximately 75 percent of its drinking water from two surface water supplies, the Colorado River through the Central Arizona Project, and the Salt and Verde rivers through SRP.

The city then maximized its reclaimed water supply through its Scottsdale Water Campus, which delivers reclaimed water directly to 23.5 golf courses in north Scottsdale for turf irrigation. To better manage groundwater conditions, the city initiated a complex groundwater modeling effort, and helped to establish a strong water conservation ethic as one of the founding partners of the Valleywide “Water – Use It Wisely” campaign.” Scottsdale achieved “safe yield” in 2006, a milestone that will help sustain groundwater resources.”

Even though safe yield has been achieved, residents are still asked to conserve water and to take advantage of the tips and tools available to them from the city’s Water Conservation Office. To learn more about how you can conserve water, please call the office at 480 312-5650.

Scottsdale is a leader in the Valley and the nation in conservation and in using artificial groundwater recharge to enhance the sustainability of the city’s water supply. This is an important part of Scottsdale’s overall water supply management strategy. Maintaining the city’s safe yield balance is the city’s next goal. Congratulations to Dave Mansfield and the entire Water Resources team.