Phoenix Arizona


Mesa – Household Hazardous Waste by azhttp
September 30, 2007, 5:37 am
Filed under: City of Mesa, Community, Community Service, Mesa | Tags:

Mesa residents encouraged to take advantage of Household Hazardous Waste

Collection events Mesa residents looking for a way to get rid of old cans of paint, batteries,

pesticides, or tires are invited to bring these and other household

hazardous waste materials to City sponsored collection events.

Our next event will be held from 8 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Oct. 6 at the

East Mesa Service Center, 6935 E. Decatur (east of Power Road, north of

University). There is no cost to take advantage of this service, but Mesa

residents are asked to show their most recent trash bill upon arrival.

Hazardous household waste will only be accepted during the event dates and

times and residents are asked to remain in their vehicles at all times while

at the collection site.

Waste should be sealed in its original container if possible, and unmarked

containers should be labeled if the contents are known.

Acceptable items:

Paint, polishes & varnishes

Pool chemicals

Turpentine

Adhesives

Antifreeze

Gasoline

Mercury

Electronics

Fuel additives

Paint-related materials

Aerosol cans

Motor oil

Appliances (limit 2)

Batteries

Pesticides

Transmission fluid

Fluorescent light bulbs

Automotive tires (limit 5); rims are accepted if the tire has been

removed

Industrial waste, 55-gallon drums and large truck tires will not be

accepted. Collected materials will be recycled, reused or disposed of in an

environmentally responsible manner. For more information, call the Mesa

Recycling Hotline at (480) 644-2222 or visit www.cityofmesa.org.

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Mars by azhttp

 
Heat-sensing ASU camera finds possible cave skylights on Mars volcano

TEMPE, Ariz. – A heat-sensitive camera designed at Arizona State University and flying on NASA’s Mars Odyssey orbiter has led a team of Mars geologists to find seven small, deep holes on the flanks of Arsia Mons, a giant volcano on Mars. The holes may be openings, called skylights, in the ceilings of underground caves. The discovery is announced in a scientific paper published recently in Geophysical Research Letters.
 
The team of scientists includes Philip Christensen of ASU, plus Glen Cushing and Tim Titus of the U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff, and Judson Wynne of Northern Arizona University. Cushing is the lead author on the paper.
 
Christensen, a Regents Professor of geological science in ASU’s School of Earth and Space Exploration, designed the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the instrument the team used to make the discovery. THEMIS has been photographing the Red Planet at five visual and 10 infrared wavelengths since February 2002.
 
Says Christensen, “THEMIS is the only heat-sensing imager currently orbiting Mars.” Temperature data was the key in spotting the potential cave skylights, he notes.
 
The features the team found are dark, nearly circular holes in the ground with diameters ranging from 100 to 250 meters (yards). The holes appear in images of Arsia Mons taken by Mars Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor orbiters. Located in the volcanic region of Tharsis, Arsia is one of the larger volcanoes on Mars, and like the rest of Tharsis, it has a heavy coating of dust.
 
“We examined the flanks of the volcano in nighttime infrared images, looking for temperature anomalies – warm spots,” explains Christensen. “Then when we re-examined the locations in daytime images, we saw the small, deep holes in the ground.”
 
Dusty surfaces, he says, become hot during the day, both on Earth and Mars. But at night, dust and sand give up heat quickly, becoming very cold shortly before sunrise. The holes, however, changed temperature by only two-thirds as much as the surface.
 
Says Christensen, “We saw that we had dark holes that are warm at night, but cool by day. The best way to explain that is to have a deep hole with vertical walls, so you’re looking at a rocky surface free from sand and dust.”
 
The team suggests that the deep holes on Arsia Mons probably formed as faults created stresses that opened spaces underground. Some of the holes are in line with strings of bowl-shaped pits where the surface has collapsed.
 
The observations have been discussed at meetings with other Mars scientists earlier this year, and they have prompted researchers using Mars Odyssey and NASA’s newer Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to search for other openings to underground spaces.
 
Christensen adds, “The temperature data is what really separated these unique holes from millions of run-of-the-mill craters, volcanic vents, and collapse pits.”
 



“Get Involved” session at Tempe Historical Museum by azhttp

TEMPE, Ariz. – Community members are invited to enjoy a cup of coffee at

9 a.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 2, while learning how to get involved as a

volunteer at the Tempe Historical Museum, 809 E. Southern Ave. This

hour-long session will cover the background and purpose of the museum,

and a brief tour of the facility. It’s a great way to explore how you

can play a role in preserving community history. Opportunities exist for

different personalities, and for those who want a one-time volunteer

experience or an ongoing commitment. For questions, call 480-350-5190.



Walk to School by azhttp

City of Tempe and local school districts hold ninth annual Walk to School

event Oct. 3

TEMPE, Ariz.- Thousands of children and parents will take part in Tempe’s

ninth annual Walk to School Day on Oct. 3 and then participate in tree

planting ceremonies to commemorate the event. Students and parents at

participating Tempe schools will walk to school between 6:30 and 8:15 a.m.

to promote community involvement and a healthier environment.

Walk to School Day celebration activities will be held at the following

schools:

* Aguilar Elementary (5800 S. Forest Ave., Tempe) at 8:20 a.m.

* Arredondo Elementary (1330 E. Carson Drive, Tempe) at 7:55 a.m.

* Broadmor Elementary (311 E. Aepli Drive, Tempe) at 8:20 a.m.

* Bustoz Elementary (2020 W. Carson Drive, Tempe) at 7:55 a.m.

* Connolly Middle (2002 E. Concorda Drive, Tempe) at 7 a.m.

* Fuller Elementary (1975 E. Cornell Drive, Tempe) at 7:50 a.m.

* Kyrene de la Mariposa Elementary (50 E. Knox Road, Tempe) at 7:15 a.m.

* Kyrene del Norte (1331 E. Redfield Road, Tempe) at 7:15 a.m.

* Laird Elementary (1500 N. Scovel St., Tempe) at 8:25 a.m.

* Meyer Elementary (2615 S. Dorsey Ln., Tempe) at 7:55 a.m.

* Nevitt Elementary (4525 E. Saint Anne St., Phoenix) at 7:55 a.m.

* Thew Elementary (2130 E. Howe Ave., Tempe) at 7:55 a.m.

* Wood Elementary (727 W. Cornell Drive, Tempe) at 8:20 a.m.

City of Tempe Councilmembers, Tempe and Kyrene elementary school board

members and other officials will then join with students and parents to

plant trees. This demonstration will show how trees make walking more

pleasant and help the environment.

Following the tree planting ceremony at each school, students and parents

will enjoy a free breakfast. Sponsors for the event include Tempe in

Motion, Tempe Elementary School District, Kyrene School District 28, IKEA

and Bashas’.

For more information on Walk to School Day, call the city of Tempe

Transportation Division, Tempe in Motion, at (480) 350-2775 or visit

www.tempe.gov/tim.



PHOENIX COLLEGE COMMUNITY ORCHESTRA by azhttp

and Chamber Music Ensemble CONCERT
 

 TUESDAY   October  9,  2007  7:30 PM

 BULPITT  AUDITORIUM

 Phoenix Community College

 1202 W. THOMAS Rd

*Don’t miss our next concert Dec. 4, 2007



The Mesa Southwest Museum by azhttp
September 27, 2007, 5:31 am
Filed under: Arizona, City of Mesa, Mesa, Museum | Tags:

The Mesa Southwest Museum will change its name to the Arizona Museum of

Natural History October 1 to more accurately reflect the mission of the

institution as a natural history museum and emphasize its statewide scope.



by azhttp
September 26, 2007, 8:55 pm
Filed under: City of Mesa, Museum, Volunteering, Volunteers | Tags: ,

Docent and Interpretive Guide training at Mesa Southwest Museum

It is a unique opportunity to volunteer and give visitors a more complete

understanding of the exhibits and the Mesa Southwest Museum as a whole.

In-depth training for new docents and interpretive guides at the museum

begins Monday October 1.

A docent is able to explain the various exhibits in the museum and interact

with the visitors. An interpretive guide explains and talks about various

items on a “touch cart.” The training is a five-week

commitment of time. It will be held on Mondays, October 1, 8, 15, 22 and

29 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Museum Theater.

For more information, contact Mesa Southwest Museum Volunteer Coordinator

Yvonne Petersen at 480-644-2760 or Yvonne.Petersen@cityofmesa.org.

The Mesa Southwest Museum will change its name to the Arizona Museum of

Natural History October 1 to more accurately reflect the mission of the

institution as a natural history museum and emphasize its statewide scope