Phoenix Arizona


International Women’s Day – Thursday, March 6
February 8, 2008, 8:24 pm
Filed under: City of Phoenix, Events, Free | Tags: , , , ,

The purpose of the annual Phoenix celebration of International Women’s Day is to eliminate all forms of discrimination against women and to raise money for scholarships for women to continue their education. For the past 16 years, the city of Phoenix, the International Women’s Day Steering Committee and Phoenix Women’s Commission have hosted a luncheon to recognize the resilient spirit of women around the world and raise funds to provide educational scholarships to re-entry women interested in furthering their education.

Since the first Phoenix International Women’s Day event in 1991, the message advocating human rights for women worldwide has reached tens of thousands of attendees. Our speakers have made us more aware of the global community of women and more appreciative of the freedoms we enjoy in our own country. We have been both moved and uplifted by the presentations of internationally recognized business leaders, educators, civil rights leaders, politicians, media representatives, authors and poets.

Gloria Steinem was the first keynote speaker. Other speakers have included Betty Mahmoody, author of the book “Not Without My Daughter;” Bella Abzug, former U.S. Congresswoman from New York (deceased); Patrica Russell-McCloud, J.D., professional orator; Mahnaz Afkami, president of the Sisterhood is Global Institute; Marjorie Agosin, human rights activist and poet; Deborah Norville, veteran journalist and anchor of the newsmagazine show, Inside Edition; Pegine Echevarria, internationally known author and motivational speaker; Lisa Ling, seasoned reporter and co-host of ABC Daytime The View; Susan L. Taylor, editorial director of Essence magazine; Laura Liswood, secretary general, Council of Women World Leaders; Julianne Malveaux, Ph.D., president and CEO, Last Word Productions, Inc.; Chin-Ning Chu, president, Strategic Learning Institute and author; and Indra Nooyi, president and CEO of PepsiCo.

The annual celebration worldwide of International Women’s Day on March 8 commemorates the continuing struggle of women to improve their lives and status. The roots of this special day go back to March 8, 1857, when hundreds of women workers in the garment and textile industry in New York City engaged in a bold and desperate action to improve their lives. They demonstrated against the brutal 12-hour work day/six days-a-week work schedule, pathetically low wages and increasing arduous workloads. They called for equal pay for women and improved working conditions. Their call for social and economic justice was ignored; their protest was harshly dispersed by the police.

These women, however, did not give up. Three years later, they formed their own labor union, again demanding improved working conditions. More than 50 years later in 1908, women from the needles trade industry demonstrated for the same issues adding to their demands the right for women to vote and laws against child labor. In 1920, German labor leader Clara Zetkin suggested that March 8 be proclaimed International Women’s Day in memory of early struggles by women to improve their lives.

The work is not yet done. Working together we can all realize the goals, dreams and aspirations of women that are deeply rooted in our history.

The 2008 Phoenix celebration will be held on Thursday, March 6, at the Phoenix Convention Center. For sponsorship opportunities, contact the city of Phoenix Equal Opportunity Department at 602-261-8242/voice or 602-534-1557/TTY.



ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY News Release

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY News Release

January 28, 2008

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY JOINS LARGEST TEACH-IN IN U.S. HISTORY
Thousands of campuses help focus nation on global-warming solutions

TEMPE, Ariz. — On Jan. 30 and 31, 2008, Arizona State University (ASU) will participate in Focus The Nation, an unprecedented teach-in on global-warming solutions.

Focus The Nation has created a teach-in model centered on the three most essential pillars needed to embrace solutions to global warming — education, civic engagement and leadership.

“Today’s college students are truly the greatest generation,” said Lewis & Clark professor of economics Eban Goodstein, author and project director for Focus The Nation. “No other generation has ever had to face this kind of challenge. We as educators would be failing if we did not prepare them with the tools to meet this challenge.”

“Arizona State University is delighted to take part in Focus the Nation,” said ASU President Michael Crow. “All of these efforts represent education at its finest. Our students have enormous power to use their education and passion to create positive change in the world.”

Focus the Nation activities at ASU include a pre-recorded web cast of the “The Two Percent Solution,” produced by the National Wildlife Federation. The web cast (which will be held at 6 p.m., Jan. 30) includes a four-minute segment on ASU’s School of Sustainability, the first school of its kind in the nation. The four-minute video will showcase what ASU is doing on Focus the Nation day and tell the larger story about sustainability at ASU.

The segment will come after a focused discussion about the “The Two Percent Solution” (reducing carbon emissions two percent every year to reach an 80 percent reduction by 2050), led by actor Edward Norton, climate scientist Steve Schneider, author Hunter Lovins (CEO, Natural Capitalism) and environmental justice leader Van Jones (executive director, Ella Baker Center, Oakland, Calif.)

The next day, Jan. 31, will include a range of global warming curricula presented by faculty members and guest speakers, flashlight tours at the Nelson Fine Arts Center, followed by a festival on Hayden Lawn from 11:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. Student groups will host interactive activities, continuous viewings of “The Two Percent Solution” and the ASU video, and hear the “recycled” of The Sustainabillies band.

As a key part of Focus the Nation, students, faculty and staff will participate in the Choose Your Future vote and select what they think are the top five solutions for global warming. Participants can vote online (www.focusthenation.org ) or at the event. Voting results will be presented nationally to congressional offices on Feb. 18. All students who vote on the Choose Your Future ballot will be eligible to win a $10,000 leadership scholarship for a project to be completed by end of August 2008.

For more information on ASU’s Focus The Nation events, visit http://schoolofsustainability.asu.edu/events/focus2008.php.

# # #

Focus The Nation is an educational initiative on global warming solutions for America occurring at more than 1,000 universities and colleges and in all 50 states on Jan. 31, 2008. As the largest teach-in in U.S. history, Focus The Nation is preparing millions of students to become leaders in the largest challenge any generation has faced. For more information, visit http://www.focusthenation.org .

Contacts:
Lauren Kuby, ASU, (480) 730-8457
Lauren.Kuby@asu.edu
Garett Reiss Brennan, Focus the Nation, (503) 768-7990
garett@focusthenation.org

Skip Derra
National Media Relations Officer/Science Writer
Arizona State University
Media Relations
(480) 965-4823
(480) 965-2159 (fax)
skip.derra@asu.edu



Mesa residents encouraged to “Treecycle”

Mesa residents can help the City of Mesa give the environment a present this

holiday season by recycling their Christmas trees. Residents are encouraged

to bring their tree to any of the free drop-off locations listed below.

Residents are asked to remove all nails, stands, tinsel and ornaments from

trees. Flocked trees will not be accepted because the flocking does not

break down in the environment.

The following 24-hour drop-off sites will be open Dec. 26-Jan. 13:

City of Mesa Solid Waste Management Department, 730 N. Mesa Dr.

East Mesa Service Center, 6935 E. Decatur St.

Superstition Springs Police/Fire Substation, 2430 S. Ellsworth Road

Mountain View Park, 845 N. Lindsay Road

Dobson Ranch Park, 2363 S. Dobson Road

Residents wishing to take their trees directly to the Salt River Landfill at

Gilbert Road and the Beeline Highway can do so between 6 a.m. and 5 p.m.,

Monday through Saturday. Mesa residents will need to have a current Arizona

driver’s license. Curbside pickup also is available for $10 and must be

requested by Jan. 4. Residents should contact the Solid Waste Management

Department at (480) 644-2688 for more information or to schedule a pickup

time. Additional information may also be found by visiting the City’s Web

site at www.cityofmesa.org/waste.

Finally, Mesa also accepts donations of live potted trees, which will be

planted in Mesa City parks. Live trees five feet or taller will be accepted

at any Mesa Fire Station. The Christmas “Treecycling” program is sponsored

by the City of Mesa and the Salt River Landfill.



Tempe offers Christmas tree disposal drop-off sites

TEMPE, Ariz. – When the holidays are over and decorations are tucked back

into storage, Tempe residents have handy options for disposing of their

Christmas trees – which should not be placed in garbage containers. Trees

can be dropped off from 7 a.m. to noon on Fridays and from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.

on Saturdays at the city’s Household Products Collection Center, 1320 E.

University Dr. Additionally, trees can be dropped off at the parking lot

west of Kiwanis Park Recreation Center,

6111 W. All-America Way, 24 hours, seven days a week. Both sites will accept

trees through Jan. 20. The city also collects trees during normal monthly

collection for brush and bulky items. Visit

www.tempe.gov/recycling/uncontainedschedule.pdf to find out when your

neighborhood is scheduled for monthly collection. For information, call

480-350-8265.



NANOTECH’S HEALTH, ENVIRONMENT IMPACTS WORRY SCIENTISTS

TEMPE, Ariz. — The unknown human health and environmental impacts of nanotechnology are a bigger worry for scientists than for the public, according to a new report published on line (November 25, 2007) in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.
 
The report was based on a national telephone survey of American households and a sampling of 363 leading U.S. nanotechnology scientists and engineers. It reveals that those with the most insight into a technology with enormous potential — and that is already emerging in hundreds of products — are unsure what health and environmental problems might be posed by the technology.
 
Two Arizona State University researchers – Elizabeth Corley, an assistant professor in the School of Public Affairs, and David Guston, director of the Center for Nanotechnology in Society and a professor of political science, are co-authors of the paper.
 
“It’s unusual for experts to see a greater risk in new technologies than for the public at large,” Guston said. “But these findings do not mean that scientists are saying that there is a problem.”
 
“Scientists are saying, ‘we don’t know,” explained the study’s lead author Dietram Scheufele, a University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of life sciences communication and journalism. “The research hasn’t been done.’”
 
The new findings are in stark contrast to controversies sparked by the advent of major technologies of the past, such as nuclear power and genetically modified foods, which scientists perceived as having lower risks than did the public.
 
Nanotechnology is based on science’s newfound ability to manipulate matter at the smallest scale, on the order of molecules and atoms. The field has enormous potential to develop applications ranging from new antimicrobial materials and tiny probes to sample individual cells in human patients, to vastly more powerful computers and lasers. Already, products with nanotechnology built in include such things as golf clubs, tennis rackets and antimicrobial food storage containers.
 
At the root of the information disconnect, said Elizabeth Corley, who conducted the survey with Scheufele, is that nanotechnology is only now starting to emerge on the nation’s policy agenda. Amplifying the problem is that the news media have not paid much attention to nanotechnology and its implications.  
 
“In the long run, this information disconnect could undermine public support for federal funding in certain areas of nanotechnology research, particularly in those areas that the public views as having lower levels of risk,” Corley said.            
 
While scientists were generally optimistic about the potential benefits of nanotechnology, they expressed significantly more concern about pollution and new health problems related to the technology. Potential health problems were in fact the highest rated concern among scientists, Guston said.
 
Twenty percent of the scientists responding to the survey indicated a concern that new forms of nanotechnology pollution may emerge, while only 15 percent of the public thought that might be a problem. More than 30 percent of scientists expressed concern that human health may be at risk from the technology, while just 20 percent of the public held such fears.
 
Of more concern to the American public, according to the report, are a potential loss of privacy from tiny new surveillance devices and the loss of more U.S jobs. Those fears were less of a concern for scientists.
 
While scientists wonder about the health and environmental implications of the new technology, their ability to spark public conversation seems to be limited, Corley and Guston said.
 
That’s because “scientists tend to treat communication as an afterthought,” Wisconsin’s Scheufele added. “They’re often not working with social scientists, industry or interest groups to build a channel to the public.”
 
The good news for scientist is that of all sources of nanotechnology information, they are the most trusted by the public.
 
“The public wants to know more about nanotechnology,” Guston added. “That’s why the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at ASU is conducting additional polls of the public and of scientists, and is organizing a National Citizens’ Technology Forum to elicit informed public perspectives on nanotechnology.”
 
“The climate for having that discourse is perfect,” Scheufele added. “There is definitely a huge opportunity for scientists to communicate with a public who trusts them.”
 
In addition to ASU’s Corley and Guston and Wisconsin’s Scheufele, other authors of the Nature Nanotechnology report include Sharon Dunwoody, Tsung-Jen Shih and Elliott Hillback of University of Wisconsin-Madison. The study was funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University and the UW-Madison Graduate School.



Help for Alzheimer’s Caregivers

Help for Alzheimer’s Caregivers

New research by The Hartford Financial Service Group in conjunction with the

MIT Age Lab and Boston University helped to develop “At the Crossroads,” a

new booklet designed to help Alzheimer caregivers make the difficult

decision on when their loved one should stop driving.

You can reach the story directly by going to

http://www.mediaseed.tv/home.aspx?Story=34143



Sparks Fly as American Idol Winner Jordin Sparks Blazes Onto the Music Scene

“And the winner of American Idol is … Jordin Sparks!” We all remember when

Ryan Seacrest said those words on the season finale. So, what has the

17-year-old songstress been up to since she won the coveted spot? During the

summer she, along with the rest of the top ten finalists, traveled across

the country for the 56-city Pop Tarts American Idol Live! Tour. In between

shows, Jordin was working hard on her self-titled debut album, which hits

stores on November 20th.

You can reach the story directly by going to

http://www.mediaseed.tv/home.aspx?Story=34139