Phoenix Arizona


Danish Christmas returns to the Petersen House by azhttp

Danish Christmas returns to the Petersen House

TEMPE, Ariz. – A Danish Christmas returns from Dec. 1 through Jan. 5 at the

Petersen House Museum, 1414 W. Southern Ave. (Northwest corner of Priest

Drive and Southern Avenue.) Admission is free; donations are appreciated.

Annette Andersen, of Kimballton, Iowa, will demonstrate how the Danish do

“papirklip,” translated as paper cuttings from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Dec. 2.

The House’s holiday decorations interpret the Danish Christmas Story,

“Peter’s Christmas,” a story by J. Krohn about a young boy’s Christmas in

Denmark in the late 1800s. It was written about the time Niels Petersen, for

whom the Petersen House is named, immigrated to the United States.

The event is brought to Tempe by the Danish Immigrant Museum of Elkhorn,

Iowa, and the Tempe Historical Museum.

Hours:

10 a.m.-2 p.m., Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday

12:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Dec. 2, 9, 16 and 23 with Peter’s Christmas Story Time

at 1:30 p.m. (light refreshments available)

Tours: Tour reservations will be taken for groups of more than 10 people on

Tuesdays thru Thursdays and Saturdays. Sundays will be open house.

Information:

Tempe Historical Museum, http://www.tempe.gov/museum/

<http://www.tempe.gov/museum/>

Petersen House, http://www.tempe.gov/petersenhouse/

<http://www.tempe.gov/petersenhouse/>

Danish Immigrant Museum, http://dkmuseum.org/ <http://dkmuseum.org/>



Tempe’s 30th Annual Family Halloween Carnival by azhttp

Tempe’s 30th Annual Halloween Carnival a treat for all

Families invited to the best “monster mash” in town

TEMPE, Ariz. – Don’t get spooked this Halloween! Come to one of the most

exciting and safe places in the Valley to celebrate Halloween with your

family. Tempe’s 30th Annual Family Halloween Carnival will be Wednesday,

Oct. 31, from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at Kiwanis Community Park, 6005 S.

All-America Way (Mill Avenue and All-America Way).

Some spooktacular highlights include entertainment, food, face painting,

carnival games and a 7:30 p.m. costume contest for goblins of all ages.

Local groups will provide live entertainment.

Admission is free and is offered to Valley families as a safe alternative to

trick-or-treating. Carnival tickets are 25 cents each, and proceeds will

benefit non-profit groups around the state.

More than 5,000 families are expected to attend this year’s event, and Tempe

hopes that number will grow even more in the years to come.

For more information visit www.tempe.gov/events or call the City of Tempe

Parks and Recreation Office at 480-350-5200. Text telephone/TDD is available

at 480-350-5050.



Book Sale – Friends of the Library by quotes

Book Sale – Friends of the Tempe Public LibraryCity of Tempe

480-350-5599

Book sale at Tempe Public Library

TEMPE, Ariz. – Purchase paperback and hardcover books for children and adults at the Tempe Public Library on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 10 a.m. to

2 p.m. The Friends of the Tempe Public Library is holding its annual Fall Book Sale in the Program Room on the lower lever, used book sales at bargain prices, with selections ranging from classics to recent bestsellers. A selection of audio-visual items will also be available.

The event will begin with a special Members Only sale from 9-10 a.m.

Community members who wish to become a member of the Friends may purchase a membership on the day of the sale. The sale will be open to the general public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Friends of the Tempe Public Library is a non-profit organization that sponsors library programs for adults and children, purchases library equipment and furnishings, and promotes the library’s activities.

The Tempe Public Library is located at 3500 S. Rural Road. For more information on the book sale or purchasing a membership, call the Friends of the Tempe Public Library at 480-350-5599.



Elements invade Post Office windows by azhttp

TEMPE, Ariz. – “Element,” an exhibition inspired by the extravagant holiday

window displays in Macy’s and other New York City department stores, will be

on display from Oct. 19-Jan. 31 at the United States Post Office, 500 S.

Mill Ave. (5th Street & Mill Avenue).

Artists Nicole Royse (Tempe), Jeff Falk (Phoenix), Adil Rahee (Mesa) and

Manny Burruel (Glendale) have prepared elaborate window displays that

celebrate one of the following elements: air, fire, earth and water.

Water

Royse earned her Bachelors of Arts degree in Art History from Arizona State

University. She currently works on several research projects in the field of

art history.

Fire

Falk is a long-time active artist in Phoenix that has studied art at

Glendale Community College, Arizona State University and Phoenix College and

has shown his artwork in more than 200 exhibitions in venues across North

America.

Earth

Since moving to Arizona and becoming an American citizen, Rahee has shown at

the Arizona State University Art Museum, as well as at the January Solo

Exhibition at Shemer Art Center and Museum. He is currently earning his

Masters of Fine Arts degree in Ceramics at ASU.

Air

Burruel is a member of the Glendale Arts Commission and is a past member of

the Arizona Commission on the Arts. He was president of the Shemer Art

Center and Museum Associations Board of Directors and is a past vice

president and artist member of Movimiento Artistico del Rio Salado. His work

has been shown in countless exhibits throughout the Phoenix Metropolitan

area. His work has appeared in numerous publications, as well.

Information: Visit http://www.tempe.gov/arts/exhibitions/USPO.htm or call

Michelle Dock 480/350-2867.



TEMPE, Ariz. – “Mighty Manimal March.” by azhttp

TEMPE, Ariz. – “Mighty Manimal March,” the second of a two-part temporary,

shared-terrain public art exhibition was installed on Friday October 12

Friday on the ASU Gammage lawn, at the northeast corner of Mill Avenue and

Apache Boulevard.

Seattle artist Nicole Kistler, formerly of Tempe, will install a more than

160 commercially produced plastic, latex and fiberglass animal lawn

ornaments, such as deer, flamingoes and coyotes on the Gammage lawn. The

menagerie features 64 flamingoes, 30 penguins, five pelicans, seven iguanas

and lizards, two pythons, 10 chicks, a baby elephant named “Bessie,” 11 wild

boar, 20 rabbits, four squirrels, six reindeer and three bears. She intends

to arrange this “river” of animals so that they appear to be on a protest

march or leaving class together and chatting about the course material.

The installation will be on display through December (date pending).

Shared Terrain exhibitions are intended to explore the blurred territory and

shared history where the university meets the city. Pedestrians and

passengers of the thousands of vehicles that pass through this area can

receive a new perspective on the familiar territory and expand their

awareness of site-responsive artwork.

This exhibition furthers the arts district concept of Mill Avenue, which

begins at Gammage Auditorium and includes the Music Building, ASU Art Museum

and the Ceramics Research Center and several School of Art galleries.

Shared Terrain information:

http://herbergercollege.asu.edu/public_art/temporary/sharedterrain.html

Nicole Kistler information: www.nicolekistler.com

<http://www.nicolekistler.com/>



Tempe delegation to accept 100 Best award by quotes
October 6, 2007, 7:08 pm
Filed under: City of Tempe, City of Tempe News, Tempe, Tempe Arizona | Tags: , , , ,

Tempe delegation to accept 100 Best award

Outstanding programs and facilities win accolade for Tempe

Tempe, AZ – A Tempe delegation will accept the city’s second 100 Best Communities for Young People award in Washington, D.C., next week.

City Councilmembers Mark Mitchell and Onnie Shekerjian, along with Tempe Community Council Executive Director Kate Hanley, and Communities in Schools Director Lynette Stonefeld, will be in attendance at the America’s Promise Alliance National Forum on Youth Oct. 10-11 in Washington.

Earlier this year, Tempe learned it had been named – for the second year in a row – as one of the top communities in the nation for youth.

Hundreds of communities in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands applied to win the designation, which honors commitments to provide healthy, safe and caring environments for young people.

Founded in 2005 by General Colin Powell, America’s Promise looks for communities that fulfill the organization’s Five Promises: Caring Adults; Safe Places; Healthy Start; Effective Education; and Opportunities to Help Others. Powell and his wife, Alma, will attend the forum, along with hundreds of representatives from other winning communities.

The two-day forum is designed to allow representatives from the winning communities to exchange ideas and hear from national leaders on issues that impact children.

Tempe’s application for the 2007 award was possible because of the support of many partners, such as the Tempe Community Council, the East Valley Boys & Girls Club, KAET Channel 8, the Tempe Elementary School District and the Mountain Park Health Clinic, among others.

Tempe won the award, in part, because of the efforts of Tempe/Kyrene Communities In Schools (CIS), a collaboration of the City of Tempe, Tempe school districts and many businesses and nonprofits. CIS has opened nine family resource centers in high-poverty elementary schools, with the aim of supporting parents as they take part in their children’s education.

Other programs and initiatives that helped single out Tempe for this honor include: the Mayor’s Youth Advisory Commission, which gives young people a voice in local government; the city’s establishment of an adaptive recreation program to serve children with disabilities who wish to participate in Special Olympics; an advisory committee of local businesses that hire special education and at-risk students for after-school jobs; the Tempe Public Library’s Experience Corps project, which pairs retirees with students for tutoring; and the first community health clinic serving low-income residents.