Phoenix Arizona


Tips to Stay Safe in the Heat by quotes

 Tips to Stay Safe in the HeatCommunity Information & Referral

or Call: (602) 263-8856

As temperatures begin to rise well over 100 degrees, the city of Phoenix Emergency Management Program, in cooperation with the state, Maricopa County, and nonprofit and faith-based organizations, is prepared to take action to ensure the safety of its residents.Both the Fire and Police departments will respond to heat emergencies and provide water during extreme heat warnings. The Human Services Department is offering heat stress training seminars for its meal delivery aides, minibus operators and caseworkers for seniors who come in contact with the elderly.

“The best advice we can give to residents is to stay hydrated, especially when you go outside during the day. And please keep a special eye on your neighbors, particularly the elderly,” said Mayor Phil Gordon.“Phoenix also is working closely with nonprofit and faith-based organizations that are helping with outreach efforts to the homeless,” he said.

DonationsThrough the city’s annual Summer Respite Program, the public is asked to donate unopened water bottles, sunscreen, new underwear, white socks, white T-shirts and prepackaged snack items that will be distributed to the homeless. Tax-deductible donations may be delivered to the city’s four Family Services Centers: Travis L. Williams, 4732 S. Central Ave., 602-534-4732; John F. Long, 3454 N. 51st Ave., 602-262-6510; Central Phoenix, 1250 S. Seventh Ave., 602-534-1250; and Sunnyslope, 914 W. Hatcher Road, 602-495-5229. The centers are open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday – Friday.

The city partners with 10 local homeless outreach teams to distribute these items. They include Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development, Stand Up for Kids, Community Bridges, HomeBase Youth Services, Connection to Care Team, The Salvation Army Project HOPE, Health Care for the Homeless, TERROS, Southwest Behavioral Health Service PATH Outreach and US Vets.City staff is working with faith-based organizations in the metropolitan area to provide heat assistance in the areas of hydration and respite efforts and wellness checks. They will help collect, store and distribute bottled water; provide a cool, safe place for people to escape the heat; and check on the elderly and disabled to make sure they have access to cool and safe places. City staff is providing training and information to these volunteers. Any faith-based organizations interested in assisting can call 602-262-4520.

St. Mary’s Food Bank also will assist the city in storing large quantities of water during the summer months. Any company or group interested in donating water or contributing funds to buy water can call the Human Services Department at 602-262-4520.The Human Services Campus Day Resource Center will provide services and respite for homeless individuals in downtown Phoenix. The Phoenix Rescue Mission will offer day respite, meals and shelter at its 35th Avenue location and United Methodist Outreach Ministries will provide additional day and night shelter for women and families. Residents needing further information about these services can call Community Information and Referral at 602-263-8856.

Tips to keep cool and healthy during times of extreme heatEven healthy people should take it easy during extremely high temperatures, and those with respiratory and other health problems must be especially careful. Stay out of the sun as much as possible. Drink extra fluids, but avoid alcoholic beverages. Alcohol can cause dehydration. The best ways to prevent a sun stress emergency are:

  • Drink before you’re thirsty and drink often.Eat a healthy diet.

  • Wear a hat or cap, keep the neck covered and wear loose fitting clothing. The greatest amount of heat loss from the body occurs at the head. This is why it is important to wear a hat or cap in the sun.
  • If you can, work in the cool hours of the day or evening.

According to the Phoenix Fire Department, heat-related injuries fall into three major categories:

  • Heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms that occur when the body loses electrolytes during profuse sweating or when inadequate electrolytes are taken into the body. They usually begin in the arms, legs or abdomen, and often precede heat exhaustion. Treatment for heat cramps is to rest in the shade, get near a fan, spray the person with water and massage the cramp.
  • Heat exhaustion is a medical emergency. When a person is suffering from heat exhaustion, they will perspire profusely and most likely will be pale. It is best treated by taking the patient to a cool place, applying cool compresses, elevating the feet and giving the patient fluids.
  • Heatstroke is the worst heat-related injury. The brain has lost its ability to regulate body temperature. The patient will be hot, reddish and warm to the touch. Their temperature will be markedly high and there will be no perspiration. This is a medical emergency: call 9-1-1. The emergency care of heatstroke is to cool the body as quickly as possible. One of the best methods for cooling the body during a heat emergency is to wrap the patient in cool, wet sheets.

Tips to avoid heat related illness:

  • Never leave infants, children or pets inside a parked vehicle.
  • Increase fluid intake, regardless of activity level. Don’t wait until thirsty to drink fluids; drink more liquid than one’s thirst indicates.
  • Avoid “heat hangover.” Continue to drink fluids even after strenuous activity. This will enable the body to maintain optimum hydration, and help prevent the after effects of heat exposure such as headaches and fatigue.
  • Avoid beverages containing alcohol, caffeine or large amounts of sugar as they dehydrate the body.
  • Avoid very cold beverages as they cause stomach cramps.
  • Limit exercise or outdoor activity between the hours of 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. when the sun is at its peak intensity. If active during this time frame, drink a minimum of 16 to 32 ounces of water each hour.
  • Some medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, may increase the risk of heat related illness. Consult your physician if you have questions.
  • Take advantage of free air conditioning! Visit shopping malls, movie theaters or the library to escape the heat for a few hours.

Outdoor protection:

  • When outdoors, wear a sunscreen with a minimum SPF15. Apply at least 30 minutes prior to going outdoors and re-apply as necessary.
  • Rest frequently in shady areas so that the body’s temperature has a chance to recover.
  • If unaccustomed to working or exercising in a hot environment, gradually increase the pace and limit exercise or work time.

Clothing:

  • Wear lightweight, loose-fitting clothing.
  • Wear sunglasses to protect the eyes.
  • Use a wide-brimmed hat to provide shade and keep the head cool.
  • Take special precaution with infants and young children by dressing them in loose, cool clothing and shading their heads

Cars and HeatWhen temperatures reach 100 degrees Fahrenheit, even with a window partially open, the temperature inside a car can reach 138 degrees in five minutes and up to 150 degrees in 15 minutes. In these conditions, children can die very quickly – in a matter of minutes. Infants and small children are particularly vulnerable due to their body configurations. The younger the child, the faster the onset of heatstroke and dehydration.

  • 75 percent of the temperature rise occurs within five minutes of closing and leaving the car.
  • 90 percent of the temperature rise occurs within 15 minutes.
  • Dark colored cars reach slightly higher temperatures than light colored cars.
  • The greater the amount of glass in the car (hatchbacks, etc.) the faster the rise in temperature.
  • Larger cars heat up just as fast as smaller cars.
  • Having the windows down even one inch causes only a slight temperature drop.

Additional Information



Ability Counts Winners Overcome Disability Obstacles by quotes

 Ability Counts Winners Overcome Disability Obstacles

Eleven Valley individuals and organizations were recognized recently for their ability to overcome barriers and significantly contribute to the advancement of people with disabilities at the 2006 Ability Counts Community and Student awards luncheon.

The Phoenix Mayor’s Commission on Disability Issues and the city’s Equal Opportunity Department coordinate the Ability Counts Community Awards Program, which recognizes various individuals and organizations each year.

This year’s community award winners are:

  • Don Aldrich Advocacy Award – Dr. Lori Latowski Grover
  • Employer of the Year Award Matrixx Initiatives Inc.
  • Employee of the Year Award – Sharon Gibbs, Arizona Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired
  • Architectural Accessibility Award Schumacher European Ltd.
  • Phoenix Mayor’s Award – Gary S. Corcoran

The annual student awards program recognized six outstanding students with disabilities for their personal and academic achievements. The students received financial awards based on their grade level. The winner in grades one through six received a cash award of $500 and the winner in grades seven through nine received a cash award of $1,000. The winner in grades 10 to 12 received a cash award of $1,500 and the three college winners received a cash award of $2,000 each. The John F. Long Foundation and the Phoenix Suns Charities provided the scholarship funds.

This year’s five student awards winners are:

Grades 1 – 6

Halie Bayless, R.E. Simpson Elementary School

Grades 7 – 9

Connor Westberg Doty, Desert Vista High School

Grades 10 – 12

Adam Schmuki, Shadow Mountain High School

College

Jessi McDonald, IIA (International Institute of Americas)

John “Matt” Hoie, Paradise Valley Community College

Jenna Gibbs, Arizona State University West Campus

The event was sponsored by the Phoenix Mayor’s Commission on Disability Issues, Phoenix Equal Opportunity Department. Here is information about the winners:

Dr. Lori Latowski GroverDon Aldrich Advocacy Award

Dr. Grover has provided an immense amount of awareness for the population of individuals with vision impairment, especially for children with vision loss. She has worked for the Foundation for Blind Children, a non-profit agency serving visually impaired children and adults for the past three years. At the foundation, Dr. Grover developed the area’s first comprehensive agency-based low-vision department serving underprivileged populations with eye care.

Dr. Grover has served as a volunteer representative from the Arizona Optometric Association Legislative Committee since 2000. She played a major role in the inclusion of new language for driver’s license recently implemented in January 2006 to include people with low vision, bringing Arizona to the table with 38 other states who afford safe and legal driving for qualified adults with vision impairment.

She has given hours of personal time educating doctors and the public through lectures about the abilities of people with vision loss. Dr. Grover’s other volunteer activities include collaborative

efforts with the University of Arizona, St. Joseph’s Hospital and the Arizona School for the Deaf and Blind. She has provided medical care to children at high risk of vision impairment as a “Health Safari” volunteer doctor.

Matrixx Initiatives Inc. Employer of the Year

Matrixx Initiatives Inc. is recognized for its outstanding efforts to enhance employment opportunities for people with disabilities. The company made it possible for Gompers Center Vocational Department and Valley of the Sun Vocational Services to employ more than 150 adults with disabilities through hand and machine packaging jobs.

Beginning October 2005 through April 2006, these centers were busy completing more than 480 thousand units of products for local and national retail stores. Matrixx Initiatives Inc. provided machinery and installed the necessary assistive components for these individuals to learn new skills and use the machines.

Sharon Gibbs, Arizona Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired – Employee of the Year

Sharon Gibbs first came to the center 15 years ago as a client who lost an eye to glaucoma and had limited vision in the other eye. She began volunteering as the centers receptionist and answered hundreds of calls daily. Gibbs assumed responsibility for helping clients and members of the community purchase or replace adaptive aids and devices like mobility canes, talking watches and Braille paper machines.

She enthusiastically filled the position of volunteer coordinator and began revising the screening and recruiting process to provide better security. Gibbs developed an orientation program, personally instructed all new volunteers in sighted-guide techniques and created a diversity of recognition and appreciation methods to continually let the volunteers know how valued they were to the success of the organization. After 15 years as a volunteer, she become a full-time employee.

Schumacher European Ltd. Architectural Accessibility

Schumacher European Ltd, a Mercedes-Benz dealership, was carefully planned and designed with more than the minimum required amenities for people with disabilities. The vision during the design process was to be accommodating to all customers.

The architect and contractor were instructed to do “their best” and the final result was a dealership that is an excellent example of a facility that accommodates people with disabilities. The facility offers accessible parking at all entrances, high-low drinking fountains, a customer waiting room with a coffee bar that provides for wheelchair seating at both the counter and tables and a customer lounge with wheelchair accessible seating at its Internet computers.

Gary CorcoranPhoenix Mayor’s Award

Gary Corcoran has volunteered thousands of hours serving as a representative of persons with disabilities for more than a decade. He continuously demonstrates the outstanding abilities of a professional person with a disability. Cocoran served as chair of the Phoenix Mayor’s Commission on Disability Issues (MCDI) and co-chaired MCDI’s transportation and housing committees. He is a respected advisor to City Council members, businesses and non-profit organizations in Phoenix and helped to establish the Arizona Statewide Independent Living Council.

Cocoran is a member of the Phoenix Citizens Transit Commission, city of Phoenix Development Advisory Board, Alhambra Village Planning Commission and the Maricopa County Housing Authority. He is, or has been, a member of accessibility oversight committees for numerous projects including Chase Field, US Airways Center, Dodge Theatre and the Phoenix light rail project. He also has given many recommendations for improving accessibility at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport.

Through his effective team building and sensitivity to the needs of others, Corcoran has made far-reaching policy recommendations in structuring, implementing and overseeing Transit 2000, establishment of the monthly Dial-A-Ride pass, citywide transit vehicle accessibility and improved housing policies. He also has participated in numerous city bond campaigns.

Grades 1 – 6

Halie Bayless – R.E. Simpson Elementary School

Halie Bayless is an ambitious fifth grader with a “can do” spirit despite the fact that she is blind. In the classroom, she earned the title “teacher of the day” for her reading efforts and also was selected as “student of the month” for her overall efforts in academics and community spirit. She works hard to increase her skills with the use of assisted technology for her academics.

Bayless recently won the Alhambra District’s fourth grade poetry contest and was published. She also was runner up in the Junior Miss beauty pageant. She is on the Washington School pool dive team and finished fourth in her age group out of five.

For the last two years, she has been top child fund raiser for the FFB Bowling for the Blind. Bayless also sings in the children’s church choir. Along with the Girl Scouts from her troop 1273, she is sending cookies and cards to our service people in Iraq. Her response to situations always exceeds expectations and sets the bar for others.

Grades 7 – 9

Connor Westberg Doty – Desert Vista High School

Connor Westberg Doty set a goal to be successful in school, not just in subjects he lived, but in the ones he didn’t like math and science. He is a lover of animals and his teachers count on him to take care of class pets. Doty’s passion has translated into a love for biology and zoology. He has made straight As in science and recently won an award for computer technology. His future goal is to go to college and find a job saving endangered species.

Doty finished the last school year on the honor roll. He also won two awards at the eighth grade awards ceremony and has received recognition for his hard work and academic accomplishments. The Altadena teachers and staff awarded him with the “Whatever it Takes Award” for students who despite huge obstacles and challenges do whatever it takes to become successful. Although Doty is autistic, he has never let his disability hinder him from his dreams.

Grades 10 – 12

Adam Schmuki – Shadow Mountain High School

Adam Schmuki qualified to compete in the 2004 and 2005 National Junior Disability Championships and in 2004, he won all five events he entered despite a spinal condition he has had

since birth. Since middle school, he has used a wheelchair as his primary means of mobility. In 2006, he competed in the Grand Canyon State Games with non-disabled athletes and qualified for the State Games of America Nationals in swimming, where he received the APS Power Player Award for display of extraordinary character.

With ongoing surgeries, Schmuki has worked to maintain a 3.5 GPA with a rigorous schedule and classes required for college. His love for reading has helped him become knowledgeable in many areas with history as his current favorite subject.

College

Jessi McDonald – International Institute of Americas (IIA)

Since the age of nine, Jessi McDonald has participated in the “Special Friends Program” under the umbrella of the state’s Child Protective Services. The program allowed him to participate in the community under the supervision of licensed CPS volunteers. During Jessi’s senior year, he was a recipient of the “Student of the Month Award” and was recognized for his service to his school.

On his graduation in May 2005, Jessi was awarded a prestigious honor sponsored by the Peoria Education Enrichment Foundation. The award was presented to one outstanding boy and one outstanding girl per high school. The scholarship award is called “Against all Odds.” Jessi’s grade point average offered him the opportunity to pursue higher education at IIA (International Institute of the Americas). He recently received his certificate for “Front Office Medical Administration.”

Jenna Gibbs – ASU West Campus

Jenna Gibbs began her life-long community service efforts as a Girl Scout who was always willing to help. She has interned and volunteered for organizations such as the American Red Cross, Arizona Humane Society, Muscular Dystrophy Association summer camp and the West Valley Crisis Nursery. At a very early age, her parents were told that she would never walk, talk or communicate. She does all three very well.

She recently completed a social work internship with the Glendale Family Development Center where she provided support to families attend the center as well as the staff. Gibbs was an honor roll student in high school and was in the Society of Women Scholars all four years. She maintained a 4.0 GPA in college graduating with a degree in psychology. Gibbs has begun her second year of a two-year Master of Social Work curriculum at ASU West.

Currently, she is placed as a hospital social worker at Banner Thunderbird Samaritan Hospital. Gibbs will graduate in May 2007 with her master’s in social work.

John “Matt” Hoie – Paradise Valley Community College

John “Matt” Hoie has a goal to help others and has volunteered more than 500 hours of service to community recreation programs, serving teens and young adults with disabilities. He is a member of Arizona’s State Leadership Team on Transition and has been a panel presenter in Washington D.C.

Another goal of his has been to participate in drama, and over the past four years, he has landed roles in three performances at his high school. In May 2006, Hoie graduated from Paradise Valley High school with a 3.71 GPA. He was voted “most outstanding senior” by the special services faculty and was the recipient of the Bryan J. Pollan Memorial Scholarship. As he prepared for graduation, he took and passed the AIMS test with an excelling score in writing.

Last spring he began a part-time job at the Scottsdale YMCA where he is developing new skills. Hoie has earned nine hours of college credit and currently is enrolled to continue his education at Paradise Valley Community College. His goal is to study exercise science.

A Special Recognition award was presented to the Phoenix Police Department’s Accessibility Enforcement (ACE) Program Volunteers. The ACE Program Volunteers respond throughout the city issuing disabled parking citations. Their mission is to provide safe and accessible parking spaces for the disabled community through enforcement and education. Directed response is accomplished by responding to locations identified through the Save Our Space Hotline. Currently there are 20 volunteers providing more than 250 hours of service and writing up to 200 citations each month.

The luncheon this year is dedicated to Randy Werner, a strong advocate for the disability community. His gift of song, compassion, big heart and endless smile gave others the courage and will to help them overcome barriers to self-development, employment and independent living. Werner passed away in December 2005, but his spirit of giving lives on.

He started Upward Motions in the early 1990s, a disability counseling and consulting business. Through his church and business, Werner worked tirelessly to improve the lives of people with disabilities through his money, time, energy and support. He maintained and supported disability organizations including ABIL (Arizona Bridge to Independent Living) and the Phoenix Mayor’s Commission on Disability Issues.

The Phoenix Mayor’s Commission on Disability Issues commemorates Randy Werner’s life and recognizes his commitment to the disability community.

For more information on the awards and the Mayor’s Commission on Disability Issues,

Call 602-262-7486/voice, 602-534-1557/TTY or visit phoenix.gov/mcdi.



Police Arrest Suspect in Baseline Killer Case by quotes

 Police Arrest Suspect in Baseline Killer Case

Phoenix and police officials today announced the arrest of a man in connection with a sexual assault attributed to a suspect known as the “Baseline Killer.” Mark Goudeau, 42, was arrested Tuesday evening near 28th Street and Thomas Road.

Police said the Baseline Killer began a spree of sexual assaults and killings in August 2005 and that he is responsible for 23 crimes, including eight murders and several sexual assaults.

“We’re fortunate today to have another monster off the streets. Thanks to many people and to so many organizations for their help,” said Mayor Phil Gordon, who addressed the media this morning at a press conference at City Hall.

Mayor Gordon praised the diligent and collaborative work of law enforcement officials that included the Phoenix Police Department, the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office, the Department of Public Safety and the Arizona Department of Corrections. He also thanked the community for working hand in hand with the city’s 3,000-member police force in providing leads that led to yesterday’s arrest.

Police Chief Jack Harris said, “All I can tell you at this time is that there is forensic evidence tying Mr. Goudeau to this specific case. I want to praise the men and women of the Phoenix Police Department who worked tirelessly and sacrificed significantly to get to the point we are at today.”

Police said that the Baseline Killer’s last known attack was in June, when he abducted a woman from a carwash near 32nd Street and Thomas Road and killed her.

The Baseline Killer is one of two serial predator cases in the Phoenix area.

In the other, dubbed the “Serial Shooter” investigation, police arrested Dale S. Hausner, 33, and Samuel J. Dieteman, 30, last month.

9-11 Sayings



Arizona Serial Killers – Phoenix Serial Killer Suspects Arrested – Police Arrest Two Suspects by quotes

Phoenix Mayor Phil Gordon announces arrest of Arizona serial killers suspectsArizona Serial Killers – Phoenix Serial Killer Suspects Arrested – Police Arrest Two Suspects

Phoenix and police officials today announced the arrest of two men in connection with a series of shootings and killings dating back to May 2005.

Dale S. Hausner and Samuel John Dieteman were arrested early this morning.

“These are two of the monsters we’ve been hunting,” said Phoenix Mayor Phil Gordon, who addressed the media this morning at a press conference at Phoenix City Hall. “I thank the Phoenix Police Department for all of their dogged and relentless pursuit of these criminals, and whose tireless work continues. I’m so grateful to all of our officers and their families.”

Gordon especially praised the investigative and collaborative work of a special crime task force that consisted of law enforcement officials from Phoenix, Tolleson, Mesa and Scottsdale police, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office.

“Over the course of the year, investigators cast a wide net over a vast array of shooting cases that included homicides, aggravated assaults and animals as victims,” said Police Chief Jack Harris. “The community in which we live has responded positively to this crisis with thousands of calls to Silent Witness.”

More than 200 Phoenix police officers worked around the clock investigating more than 6,000 tips from residents who called in with information.