Phoenix Arizona


Super Bowl Events Kick Off at Phoenix Children’s Hospital by quotes

Super Bowl Events

NFL Youth Football Clinics
Saturday, January 26, 2008, 9:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Reach 11 Sports Complex, 2425 E. Deer Valley Road, Phoenix, AZ 85027
Sunday, January 27, 2008, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Snedigar Sports Complex, 4500 South Alma School Road, Chandler, AZ 85248.

Super Bowl XLII in Arizona will mark the 20th anniversary of the NFL Youth Football Clinics. The clinics invites 3,200 kids aged 7-14 where NFL players present an education and drug awareness program, sign autographs, teach the children the fundamentals of their position, and stress important motivational messages.

Phoenix Children’s Hospital’s Crewsn’Health Mobile , a 35-foot Mobile Medical Unit (MMU), will bring comprehensive medical help directly to youth at the football clinic. Dr. Randy Christensen and residents will staff the van both days.  For more information on the youth clinics, contact James Winfrey – NFL Youth Football Clinic Coordinator at 480-362-4236 or jwinfrey@azsuperbowl.com 



Barrett-Jackson Collector Car Auction by quotes

Barrett-Jackson Collector Car Auction

Posted by Bill Austin  | via www.evliving.com This link will take you off Topix

Barrett Jackson Collector Car AuctionWith sunny skies and forecast highs in the mid-60s, crowds numbering in the thousands, dozens of stars and more than 1000 unique cars on the auction block, the numbers don’t lie– Westworld is the place to be …

More: Barrett Jackson Collector Car Auction



Mesa VITA volunteers needed for training session by quotes

Mesa VITA volunteers needed for training session

 

Source: VITA volunteers

Volunteer tax preparers are still needed in Mesa for a training session for the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA) that begins Saturday January 19 at A New Leaf (MesaCAN), 635 E. Broadway, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The only experience needed is the spirit of volunteerism! The IRS will provide free training and materials. Basic computer knowledge is a definite plus.

New volunteers will need 20 hours of training to prepare the basic 1040 tax returns and related schedules and know the eligibility rules for claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credit (CTC).

 

The other classes are scheduled for January 23, 30 and 31 from 6 p.m. to 9

p.m. Returning volunteer tax preparers need 10 hours of self-study. There is also a need for other volunteers with the VITA program, including greeters, screeners and translators. All volunteers must attend an orientation session Saturday January 26 at the City of Mesa Utility Building, 640 N. Mesa Drive, from 9 a.m. to noon.

VITA offers free tax help to hard working community members who cannot prepare their own tax returns. VITA tax sites will be open in February, March and April at four locations in Mesa: Mesa Community College, Southern and Dobson Campus, Student Union, 1833 W. Southern Ave.; Mesa Community College, Red Mountain Campus, Acacia Village Computer Lab, 2305 N. Power Road; A New Leaf (MesaCAN), 635 E. Broadway and Mercy Housing Villas de Merced, Club House, 520 N. Mesa Drive.

For more information, contact Mesa Human Services Specialist Lisa Wilson at 480-644-5831 or

 

Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) information from CIR
Updated January 2, 2008
Return to Give Help
VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) is a program that provides free tax preparation to benefit individuals with low to moderate income, senior citizens, Non-English speaking persons, and individuals with disabilities. Volunteers prepare basic tax returns at conveniently located community and neighborhood locations. Returns are filed electronically resulting in fast refunds. All training and materials are provided free from the IRS.

Local VITA Impact

In Arizona, millions of EITC dollars were not collected by eligible families. In one hour, you can help a moderate or low-income family collect an average of $1,871 (to a maximum of $4,700) for things like meeting basic needs, purchasing a house or buying a car through your local Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) program!

Volunteers play a crucial role in EITC campaigns. Free tax preparation sites depend on volunteers and not only do they help working families get the credit(s) they deserve, but also save families the fee charged by professional tax preparers. Last year, volunteers returned more than $7 million impacting more than 10,000 hard working families.

Bill Austin
Scottsdale Job Network
AZhttp, Inc.



LinkedIn® Live! Phoenix Event by quotes

The November 6th event was called “The best networking event I have ever been to.” by a large percentage of the participants.

LinkedIn® Live!

Phoenix Event

“LinkedIn” and it’s logo are registered trademarks of the LinkedIn Corporation.

Handlebar J’s

7116 Becker Lane

Scottsdale , AZ 85254

Tuesday January 8th 2008

5:30 – 7:30 PM

We are pleased to announce the next LinkedIn® Centric event in the Phoenix Market at Handlebar J’s!

The LinkedIn® Live! Event brings the top LinkedIn® Users together with key members of the Greater Phoenix Metropolitan Community (who should be top Linkedin® users) and introducing them to each other, and to IA and its mission.

This month, the event is co-produced in alliance with the Arizona Technology Council .

LinkedIn Live! is a Free Event with appetizers sponsored by Lumension Security and a Cash Bar.

Register Now

And bring one or two of your most connected LinkedIn® connections!

Join us as we further unlock the power of the extended Metro Phoenix network!

Co-Produced by

Sponsored by

Brought to you in alliance with:

azhttp



Tips to Stay Safe in the Heat by quotes

 Tips to Stay Safe in the HeatCommunity Information & Referral

or Call: (602) 263-8856

As temperatures begin to rise well over 100 degrees, the city of Phoenix Emergency Management Program, in cooperation with the state, Maricopa County, and nonprofit and faith-based organizations, is prepared to take action to ensure the safety of its residents.Both the Fire and Police departments will respond to heat emergencies and provide water during extreme heat warnings. The Human Services Department is offering heat stress training seminars for its meal delivery aides, minibus operators and caseworkers for seniors who come in contact with the elderly.

“The best advice we can give to residents is to stay hydrated, especially when you go outside during the day. And please keep a special eye on your neighbors, particularly the elderly,” said Mayor Phil Gordon.“Phoenix also is working closely with nonprofit and faith-based organizations that are helping with outreach efforts to the homeless,” he said.

DonationsThrough the city’s annual Summer Respite Program, the public is asked to donate unopened water bottles, sunscreen, new underwear, white socks, white T-shirts and prepackaged snack items that will be distributed to the homeless. Tax-deductible donations may be delivered to the city’s four Family Services Centers: Travis L. Williams, 4732 S. Central Ave., 602-534-4732; John F. Long, 3454 N. 51st Ave., 602-262-6510; Central Phoenix, 1250 S. Seventh Ave., 602-534-1250; and Sunnyslope, 914 W. Hatcher Road, 602-495-5229. The centers are open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday – Friday.

The city partners with 10 local homeless outreach teams to distribute these items. They include Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development, Stand Up for Kids, Community Bridges, HomeBase Youth Services, Connection to Care Team, The Salvation Army Project HOPE, Health Care for the Homeless, TERROS, Southwest Behavioral Health Service PATH Outreach and US Vets.City staff is working with faith-based organizations in the metropolitan area to provide heat assistance in the areas of hydration and respite efforts and wellness checks. They will help collect, store and distribute bottled water; provide a cool, safe place for people to escape the heat; and check on the elderly and disabled to make sure they have access to cool and safe places. City staff is providing training and information to these volunteers. Any faith-based organizations interested in assisting can call 602-262-4520.

St. Mary’s Food Bank also will assist the city in storing large quantities of water during the summer months. Any company or group interested in donating water or contributing funds to buy water can call the Human Services Department at 602-262-4520.The Human Services Campus Day Resource Center will provide services and respite for homeless individuals in downtown Phoenix. The Phoenix Rescue Mission will offer day respite, meals and shelter at its 35th Avenue location and United Methodist Outreach Ministries will provide additional day and night shelter for women and families. Residents needing further information about these services can call Community Information and Referral at 602-263-8856.

Tips to keep cool and healthy during times of extreme heatEven healthy people should take it easy during extremely high temperatures, and those with respiratory and other health problems must be especially careful. Stay out of the sun as much as possible. Drink extra fluids, but avoid alcoholic beverages. Alcohol can cause dehydration. The best ways to prevent a sun stress emergency are:

  • Drink before you’re thirsty and drink often.Eat a healthy diet.

  • Wear a hat or cap, keep the neck covered and wear loose fitting clothing. The greatest amount of heat loss from the body occurs at the head. This is why it is important to wear a hat or cap in the sun.
  • If you can, work in the cool hours of the day or evening.

According to the Phoenix Fire Department, heat-related injuries fall into three major categories:

  • Heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms that occur when the body loses electrolytes during profuse sweating or when inadequate electrolytes are taken into the body. They usually begin in the arms, legs or abdomen, and often precede heat exhaustion. Treatment for heat cramps is to rest in the shade, get near a fan, spray the person with water and massage the cramp.
  • Heat exhaustion is a medical emergency. When a person is suffering from heat exhaustion, they will perspire profusely and most likely will be pale. It is best treated by taking the patient to a cool place, applying cool compresses, elevating the feet and giving the patient fluids.
  • Heatstroke is the worst heat-related injury. The brain has lost its ability to regulate body temperature. The patient will be hot, reddish and warm to the touch. Their temperature will be markedly high and there will be no perspiration. This is a medical emergency: call 9-1-1. The emergency care of heatstroke is to cool the body as quickly as possible. One of the best methods for cooling the body during a heat emergency is to wrap the patient in cool, wet sheets.

Tips to avoid heat related illness:

  • Never leave infants, children or pets inside a parked vehicle.
  • Increase fluid intake, regardless of activity level. Don’t wait until thirsty to drink fluids; drink more liquid than one’s thirst indicates.
  • Avoid “heat hangover.” Continue to drink fluids even after strenuous activity. This will enable the body to maintain optimum hydration, and help prevent the after effects of heat exposure such as headaches and fatigue.
  • Avoid beverages containing alcohol, caffeine or large amounts of sugar as they dehydrate the body.
  • Avoid very cold beverages as they cause stomach cramps.
  • Limit exercise or outdoor activity between the hours of 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. when the sun is at its peak intensity. If active during this time frame, drink a minimum of 16 to 32 ounces of water each hour.
  • Some medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, may increase the risk of heat related illness. Consult your physician if you have questions.
  • Take advantage of free air conditioning! Visit shopping malls, movie theaters or the library to escape the heat for a few hours.

Outdoor protection:

  • When outdoors, wear a sunscreen with a minimum SPF15. Apply at least 30 minutes prior to going outdoors and re-apply as necessary.
  • Rest frequently in shady areas so that the body’s temperature has a chance to recover.
  • If unaccustomed to working or exercising in a hot environment, gradually increase the pace and limit exercise or work time.

Clothing:

  • Wear lightweight, loose-fitting clothing.
  • Wear sunglasses to protect the eyes.
  • Use a wide-brimmed hat to provide shade and keep the head cool.
  • Take special precaution with infants and young children by dressing them in loose, cool clothing and shading their heads

Cars and HeatWhen temperatures reach 100 degrees Fahrenheit, even with a window partially open, the temperature inside a car can reach 138 degrees in five minutes and up to 150 degrees in 15 minutes. In these conditions, children can die very quickly – in a matter of minutes. Infants and small children are particularly vulnerable due to their body configurations. The younger the child, the faster the onset of heatstroke and dehydration.

  • 75 percent of the temperature rise occurs within five minutes of closing and leaving the car.
  • 90 percent of the temperature rise occurs within 15 minutes.
  • Dark colored cars reach slightly higher temperatures than light colored cars.
  • The greater the amount of glass in the car (hatchbacks, etc.) the faster the rise in temperature.
  • Larger cars heat up just as fast as smaller cars.
  • Having the windows down even one inch causes only a slight temperature drop.

Additional Information



Phoenix Housing Market by quotes

Greater Phoenix resale home market continues steady trend

MESA, Ariz. — The local resale housing market appears to be fairly stable, with 4,910 recorded sales in June 2007. The activity of June closely followed May 2007 at 5,220 sales and was not far below last year’s 5,460 transactions. The month of June brought the second quarter activity to a close with 14,990 sales, in contrast to 14,185 sales for the first quarter and last year’s second quarter sales of 18,310.

The current level of activity brings much needed sustainability; however, the 2007 year-to-date total of 29,175 homes is well below the 36,290 for 2006 year to date and 58,030 sales for 2005 year to date.

While the resale market is following a very traditional pattern, there are increasing risks that the market could move lower, driven by geopolitical risks and tighter mortgage underwriting guidelines,” said Jay Q. Butler, director of Realty Studies in ASU’s Morrison School of Management and Agribusiness at the Polytechnic campus. Both of these factors could make it increasingly difficult for people who desire another home to be able to finance it.

The new home market continues to be a competitive and attractive alternative to the resale home in many areas of the market as new home builders have been aggressively pursuing buyers through incentives such as specially priced up-grades, free pools and gift cards. Even with these concerns, the general expectation is that the 2007 resale housing market should be a good year, but nowhere near the records.

Much like the ever-increasing sales activity of the last few years, the rapid improvement in prices has disappeared. The median home price in June was $263,145 in comparison to $262,000 for May and last year’s $267,000.  For June 2007, 17 percent of all recorded sales were for homes priced from $125,000 to $199,999, 41 percent for $200,000 to $299,999 and 40 percent for homes priced over $300,000.  Last year, the distribution was 14 percent of all recorded sales were for homes priced from $125,000 to $199,999, 44 percent for $200,000 to $299,999 and 39 percent for homes priced over $300,000. Since the greater Phoenix area is so large, the median price can range significantly from $692,750 ($711,000 in May) in North Scottsdale to $148,500 ($158,500 in May) in the Sky Harbor area of the city of Phoenix.

Because mortgage interest rates decline slightly from last year’s 6.2 percent to 5.9 percent and home prices remained fairly stable, the monthly payment decreased slightly from last year’s $1,390 to $1,330. Even though mortgage interest rates have been declining over the last year, they have been in an upward trend for the last few months creating mounting concerns about the ability of some homeowners to acquire or maintain their homes. In response to issues raised in the subprime market, underwriting guidelines have been tightening, making it more difficult for potential buyers to qualify for a mortgage.

Townhouse/condominium units have retained some popularity with seasonal visitors, investors and people seeking affordable housing, so this housing sector showed an improvement from last year’s 1,035 sales to 1,125 sales for June 2007 (1,245 sales in May). Even with popularity, the median home price decreased slightly from $184,990 in May to $181,250.

The median square footage for a single-family home recorded sold in June 2007 was 1,725 square feet, which is larger than the 1,640 square feet for a year ago. The larger size further demonstrates the role of the move-up sector in the local housing market. In the townhouse/condominium sector, the median square footage was 1,105 square feet, which is larger than the 1,090 square feet reported a year ago.

  1. In contrast to June 2006, recorded sales in the city of Phoenix decreased from 1,725 sales to 1,320 sales, while the median sales price increased to $227,390 from $225,000 for a year ago. Since Phoenix is a geographically large city, the median price can range significantly such as $148,500 in the Sky Harbor area to $343,000 ($313,495 in May) in the Union Hills area. The townhouse/condominium sector increased from 300 to 370 sales, while the median price increased from $150,000 to $166,500.
  2. The Scottsdale resale home market declined from 465 to 415 recorded sales, along with the median sales price decreasing from last year’s $640,000 to $612,750. The median resale home price is $692,750 ($711,000 in May) in North Scottsdale and $316,000 ($320,000 in May) in South Scottsdale. The townhouse/condominium sector in Scottsdale stayed at 250 sales, while the median sales price decreased from $264,750 to $249,900.
  3. The Mesa resale housing market declined from 585 to 520 sales, while the median price fell from $247,600 to $235,000 ($238,000 in May). The townhouse/condominium sector also fell from 160 to 135 sales, while the median home price decreased from $156,250 to $154,465.
  4.                

  5. Glendale decreased from 430 to 325 sales and the median sales price decreased from $253,000 a year ago to $243,480 ($243,000 in May). The townhouse/condominium sector decreased from 70 to 50 sales, while the median sales price remained at $145,000.

       

·       For the city of Peoria, the resale market declined from 250 to 230 sales, while the median price moved from $272,900 to $255,000 ($255,000 in May). The townhouse/condominium sector decreased from 35 to 20 sales and the median price increased from $163,500 to $182,000.

  1. In comparison to a year ago, the Sun City resale market improved from 75 to 115 sales, while the median sales price decreased to $185,000 from $215,000. Resale activity in Sun City West remained at 45 sales, the median sales price decreased from $258,950 to $217,500. The townhouse/condominium market in Sun City remained stable at 45 recorded sales, while the median home price decreased from $143,250 to $127,750. In Sun City West, activity fell from 15 to 10 sales and the median sales price decreased from $178,000 to $175,500.
  2. The resale market in Gilbert decreased from 330 to 315 sales and the median sales price decreased from $330,000 to $297,000 ($300,000 in May). The townhouse/condominium market improved from 10 to 15 sales as the median sales price decreased from $238,750 to $189,900.

  • For the city of Chandler, the resale market fell from 380 to 370 recorded sales, while the median sales price went from $295,000 to $288,000 ($297,750 in May). The townhouse/condominium market increased from 40 to 45 sales, and the median sales price declined from $176,450 to $175,000.

§       The resale market in Tempe decreased from 160 to 140 sales, with the median sales price decreasing from $298,500 to $289,000 ($270,780 in May). The townhouse/condominium sector moved up from 70 to 95 sales, with the median sales price decreased from $191,000 to $183,000.

  1. The highest median sales price was in Paradise Valley at $1,932,500 with a median square foot house of 3,965 square feet.

·       In the West Valley, the following communities represent 10 percent of the resale market.

o       Avondale fell from 120 to 90 sales with the median price moving from $259,050 to $239,000 ($223,000 in May).

o       El Mirage decreased from 80 to 60 sales, while the median home price went from $215,000 to $195,500 ($200,000 in May).

o       Goodyear went from 90 to 80 sales, while the median price increased from $290,000 to $299,000 ($250,000 in May).

o       Surprise increased from 175 sales to 255 sales, while the median price decreased from $254,900 for a year ago to $230,000 ($245,070 in May).

**********************

REalty studies

Realty Studies is associated with the Morrison School of Management and Agribusiness at Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus. Realty Studies collects and analyzes data concerning real estate in the greater Phoenix metropolitan area. Realty Studies is a comprehensive and objective source of real estate information for private, public and governmental agencies.  Its director, Dr. Jay Q. Butler, may be reached at (480) 727-1300 or e-mail him at Jay.Butler@asu.edu. To subscribe to RSS feed for Realty Studies news, visit http://www.poly.asu.edu/realty/rss.html.

ASU’s Polytechnic campus, located in southeast Mesa, offers bachelor and graduate degree programs, unparalleled by other Arizona state universities, through the Morrison School of Management and Agribusiness, the School of Applied Arts and Sciences, the School of Educational Innovation and Teacher Preparation, and the College of Technology and Innovation. Visit us online at http://www.east.asu.edu.



Biomedical Sciences at ASU by quotes

Bee researcher at Arizona State University is one of 20 new Pew Scholars in the biomedical sciences

TEMPE, Ariz.– It’s hard to imagine, for most of us, that the bees we see buzzing between strands of orange flowers of the desert mallow could potentially usher in a medical breakthrough. However, in the right hands, these insects best known for their banded coloration, social life and skills with pollination could some day be the key to advancements in biomedical neuroscience of aging – if Gro Amdam has her way, with support from The Pew Charitable Trusts.
 
Amdam, an assistant professor in Arizona State University’s School of Life Sciences who heads social insect studies in laboratories at both ASU and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences’ Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences, is one of only 20 researchers chosen this year to enter the Trusts’ exclusive rolls as a Pew Scholar in the biomedical sciences. About 150 eligible colleges across the nation were invited to submit a candidate for the award this year. Remarkably, it was the first year that Arizona State University was invited to participate and Amdam was the sole candidate put forward by ASU President Michael M. Crow.
 
“The focus of this award – biomedical sciences – is an evolving area of emphasis for ASU,” says Crow. “The fact that the award is going to a researcher using the honeybee as a biomedical model exemplifies the spirit of ASU unconstrained by disciplinary boundaries.”
 
Robert Page, founding director of ASU’s School of Life Sciences and Amdam’s oft-time collaborator in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, says he never had any doubt that the Pew Trusts would select Amdam, and that the award has special significance on several fronts: “This the first year that ASU was invited to nominate, so it marks our initiation as an institution into this select ’club.’ The fact that our faculty member was chosen also shows that ASU belongs in the club. Then, when you consider that this award is in the area of biomedical science and will support research using honeybees … it shows just how much the world of biology is changing and that comparative biology will be central even to the biomedical sciences.”
 
The Pew Charitable Trusts is composed of seven separate trusts established between 1948 and 1979 by the heirs of Joseph N. Pew, founder of the Sun Oil Company, and is driven by the power of knowledge to solve today’s most challenging problems. Pew applies a rigorous, analytical approach to improve public policy, inform the public and stimulate civic life. It partners with a diverse range of donors, public and private organizations and concerned citizens who share its commitment to fact-based solutions and goal-driven investments to improve society.



“The Pew Scholars are among America’s finest biomedical research entrepreneurs. They seek out and mine unexpected leads in a quest for knowledge that may one day lead to new medical treatments and save lives,” says Rebecca W. Rimel, president and chief executive office of The Pew Charitable Trusts.



As a Pew Scholar, Amdam will receive a $240,000 award over four years to help support her research.



Among past Pew Scholars are Nobel Prize winners, such as Craig Mello from the University of Massachusetts, who shared the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine with Stanford’s Andrew Fire for their development of the RNA interference (RNAi) technique. Amdam’s research will make use of RNAi to study genes implicated in plasticity of honeybee neuronal aging.


Of the award, Amdam says, “In the scholarly system of Norway, where I come from, such recognitions are very rare, nearly unheard of. This is a great honor for me.” She also notes, “The award gives me a unique opportunity to take my research at ASU into the field of neuroscience, and neurogerontology in particular.”
 
According to Amdam, her Pew project will join two lines of study that have never been coupled: the emerging field of honeybee comparative neurogerontology – in which Amdam has published the first work on plasticity of neuronal oxidative damage – and honeybee behavioral physiology, where cumulative data show that age-related cell damage can be reversed. Amdam has authored or coauthored publications in Nature, Public Library of Science Biology, Advances in Cancer Research, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Experimental Gerontology and Behavioral Brain Research in the past year, laying the foundation for this work. Her group has documented that social reversal, which triggers old bees (that usually forage outside of the hive) to revert to tasks normally performed by younger bees (that nurse larvae within the hive), is associated with reversal of several physiological markers of senescence. Her findings, and supporting findings from other groups, Amdam says, indicate that “behavioral reversal triggers a systemic response, one which translates into a unique cascade of cell repair in bees.” Preliminary data collected in her laboratory suggest that this cascade can include the central nervous system.
 
“If social reversal causes arrest or partial clearance of neuronal oxidative damage, my project funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts will establish the first model for neuronal oxidative remission,” Amdam notes.
 
Oxidative brain damage is a fundamental pathology in normal human aging and in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, and development of novel treatments has high priority in biomedical research, says Amdam. Although she describes this line of discovery as risky, “its prospective contribution is of considerable relevance for human health.”