Phoenix Arizona


The Mesa Southwest Museum by azhttp
September 27, 2007, 5:31 am
Filed under: Arizona, City of Mesa, Mesa, Museum | Tags:

The Mesa Southwest Museum will change its name to the Arizona Museum of

Natural History October 1 to more accurately reflect the mission of the

institution as a natural history museum and emphasize its statewide scope.



Greater Phoenix resale numbers end summer on sour note by azhttp

MESA, Ariz. — With 4,240 recorded sales in August 2007, the local resale housing market continues its uninspiring march. The activity of August followed July 2007 at 4,330 sales and was below last year’s 5,685 transactions. The month of August brought the year-to-date total to 37,750 sales, which is well below the 47,515 for 2006 year to date and 78,935 sales for 2005 year to date.

“Primarily the role of August is to act as a transition from the heady days of summer to the lower recorded sales of the last months of the year,” said Jay Butler, director of Realty Studies in the Morrison School of Management and Agribusiness at the Polytechnic campus.

“However, there are increasing risks that the market could move lower than expected, driven by geopolitical risks and tighter mortgage underwriting guidelines. Both of these factors could make it increasingly difficult for people wanting to buy, but are not able to obtain needed financing. This point will be especially true in the move-up market,” Butler added.

The combination of large inventories and low interest rates have enabled people to purchase more expensive homes, which is one reason the county median price has remained fairly stable. But, recent troubles in the nonconforming mortgage market (mortgages above $417,000) have begun to adversely impact the move-up market. Last year, 39 percent of the resale homes sold for more than $300,000, while it was 37 percent for August 2007.

Foreclosures and new homes are providing a competitive alternative to the resale home in many areas of the market. New home builders continue to aggressively pursue buyers through incentives such as specially priced upgrades, free pools and gift cards. Thus, the 2007 resale housing market is showing signs of increasing weaknesses that could drive it below the current expectations of it being a good year.

Much like the ever-increasing sales activity of the last few years, the rapid improvement in price has disappeared. The median home price in August was $255,000 in comparison to $265,000 for July and last year’s $262,500. The most evident impact of lower prices is improved affordability. Although mortgage interest rates increased slightly from last year’s 6.1 percent to 6.2 percent, the lower median price allowed the monthly payment to decrease slightly from last year’s $1,350 to $1,330.

Changes in median prices can vary tremendously throughout the valley. For the western suburbs the median price has fallen from $240,000 in August 2006 to $217,450. On the other hand, homes in the North Mesa area have gone from last year’s $235,000 to $255,000. While some areas have declining prices, other areas are increasing or remaining fairly stable, especially the mature neighborhoods that are close to freeways, retail and schools. Since the greater Phoenix area is so large, the median price can range significantly from $680,000 ($697,500 in July) in North Scottsdale to $189,000 ($185,000 in July) in the Maryvale area of the city of Phoenix.

Although townhouse/condominium units have retained some popularity with seasonal visitors, investors and people seeking affordable housing, this housing sector has continually fallen from the 1,350 sales in March to 955 sales, while there were 1,100 sales for a year ago. Even with slower sales, the median home price increased slightly from $181,000 in July to $182,500 in August ($170,000 for August 2006).

The median square footage for a single-family home recorded sold in August 2007 was 1,740 square feet, which is larger than the 1,640 square feet for a year ago. The larger size further demonstrates the role of the move-up sector in the local housing market. In the townhouse/condominium sector, the median square footage was 1,115 square feet which is larger than the 1,090 square feet reported a year ago.

·       In contrast to August 2006, recorded sales in the city of Phoenix decreased from 1,760 sales to 1,160 sales, while the median sales price decreased to $220,000 from $224,000 for a year ago. Since Phoenix is a geographically large city, the median prices can range significantly such as $189,000 in the Maryvale area to $314,750 ($330,000 in July) in the Union Hills area. The townhouse/condominium sector decreased from 395 to 300 sales, while the median price increased from $153,295 to $173,000.

·       While the Scottsdale resale home market declined from 390 from a year ago to 360 recorded sales, the median sales price decreased from last year’s $598,500 to $559,375. The median resale home price is $680,000 ($697,500 in July) in North Scottsdale and $305,000 ($315,000 in July) in South Scottsdale. The townhouse/condominium sector in Scottsdale increased slightly from 205 to 210 sales, while the median sales price decreased from $266,000 to $242,900.

·       Compared to August 2006, the Mesa resale housing market declined from 645 to 460 sales, while the median price fell from $240,000 to $237,000 ($242,000 in July). The townhouse/condominium sector also fell from 165 to 120 sales, while the median home price decreased from $159,950 to $152,000.

                   

·       Glendale decreased from 445 to 300 sales and the median sales price decreased from $255,000 to $240,750 ($238,500 in July). The townhouse/condominium sector decreased from 65 to 45 sales, while the median sales price decreased from $143,000 to $140,500.

       
·       For the city of Peoria, the resale market declined from 280 to 205 sales, while the median price dropped  from $270,000 to $257,500 ($264,950 in July). The townhouse/condominium sector decreased from 25 to 20 sales and the median price went from $165,000 to $162,500.

·       In comparison to a year ago, the Sun City resale market remained at 90 sales, while the median sales price decreased to $175,000 from $200,000. Resale activity in Sun City West declined from at 50 to 45 sales, the median sales price decreased from $240,650 to $220,000. The townhouse/condominium market in Sun City declined from 50 to 45 recorded sales, while the median home price decreased from $139,000 to $124,000. In Sun City West, activity fell from 15 to 10 sales and the median sales price decreased from $175,750 to $130,000.

·       The resale market in Gilbert decreased from 355 to 290 sales and the median sales price decreased from $320,000 to $300,000 ($314,500 in July). The townhouse/condominium market remained at 10 sales as the median sales price decreased from $210,000 to $180,000.

  • For the city of Chandler, the resale market fell from 410 to 300 recorded sales, while the median sales price went from $308,000 to $282,800 ($308,375 in July). The townhouse/condominium market stayed at 40 sales and the median sales price declined from $182,000 to $163,250.

·       The resale market in Tempe decreased from 155 to 115 sales, with the median sales price decreasing from $299,950 to $270,000 ($283,810 in July). The townhouse/condominium sector was stable at 70 sales, but the median sales price increased from $179,250 to $194,950.

·       The highest median sales price was in Paradise Valley at $1,950,000 with a median square foot house of 4,220 square feet.

·       In the West Valley, the following communities represent 10 percent of the resale market.

  •  
    •  
        o       Avondale fell from 130 to 95 sales with the median price moving from $254,325 to $223,275 ($222,500 in July).
        o       El Mirage decreased from 80 to 60 sales, while the median home price went from $212,750 to $185,000 ($180,000 in July).

        o       Goodyear went from 95 to 80 sales, while the median price decreased from $280,000 to $272,000 ($248,750 in July).

        o       Surprise decreased from 225 sales to 200 sales, with the median price decreasing from $250,000 to $232,500 ($234,900 in July).

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Realty studies

Realty Studies is associated with the Morrison School of Management and Agribusiness at Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus. Realty Studies collects and analyzes data concerning real estate in the greater Phoenix metropolitan area. Realty Studies is a comprehensive and objective source of real estate information for private, public and governmental agencies.  Its director, Dr. Jay Q. Butler, may be reached at (480) 727-1300 or e-mail him at Jay.Butler@asu.edu. To subscribe to RSS feed for Realty Studies news, visit http://www.poly.asu.edu/realty/rss.html.

ASU’s Polytechnic campus, located in southeast Mesa, offers bachelor and graduate degree programs, unparalleled by other Arizona state universities, through the Morrison School of Management and Agribusiness, the School of Applied Arts and Sciences, the School of Educational Innovation and Teacher Preparation, and the College of Technology and Innovation. Visit us online at http://www.east.asu.edu.



Mesa Southwest Museum by azhttp
September 12, 2007, 6:12 pm
Filed under: Artists, Arts, Arts and Entertainment, City of Mesa, Entertainment, Mesa, Museum | Tags:

Night at the Mesa Southwest Museum

Dress as your favorite character in the movie Night at the Museum and come

see the real thing at the Mesa Southwest Museum Friday September 14 from

5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Admission is free for this special event.

“This is a wonderful opportunity to showcase the museum as part of Friday

Night Out, have fun with the ‘Night at the Museum’ theme and promote our

name change,” Mesa Southwest Museum Director Tom Wilson said.

After the museum visit, you are encouraged to stay in Downtown Mesa for

Friday Night Out. Approximately 50 shops, galleries, restaurants and other

businesses along Main Street between Country Club Drive and Center

Street have been staying open until 10 p.m. for Friday Night Out on the

second Friday of every month. Some offer discounts and many host live

music, art exhibitions and other activities.

The Mesa Southwest Museum will change its name to the Arizona Museum of

Natural History October 1 to more accurately reflect the mission of the

institution as a natural history museum and emphasize its statewide scope .

For more information on Night at the Museum, contact Mesa Southwest Museum

Curator of Education Kathy Eastman at 480-644-5662.



Thousands of donations to Mesa Hydration Donation campaign by azhttp
September 10, 2007, 8:57 pm
Filed under: City of Mesa, Community Service, Homeless, Mesa | Tags:

Homeless and unsheltered people benefited from the generosity of residents who donated to the Mesa Hydration Donation campaign, which ended August 30.

The City of Mesa’s Office of Human Services facilitated the delivery of 21,000 bottles of water, Valley of the Sun United Way donated 9,400 bottles and approximately 8,000 bottles were donated to United Food Bank to help the homeless and unsheltered cope with the extreme heat. In addition, Word of Grace Church collected more than a thousand cases of water during the campaign and handed out 50 cases a week. They have extra cases of water that are available to social service agencies. The Mesa Fire Department and Paz de Cristo also collected numerous donations of water and Gatorade.

“Mesa is a community filled with folks that care and are willing to come together for a common cause,” City of Mesa Human Services Specialist Lisa Wilson said.

United Food Bank delivered water to numerous agencies in the Valley including Word of Grace Church, A New Leaf-East Valley Men’s Center, Sprinzl Murphy food pantry, Paz de Cristo, Central Arizona Shelter Services (CASS), The Genesis Project, Basic Mission, Community Bridges, Tempe Community Action Agency, Tempe Salvation Army and Gilbert and Chandler CAP agencies.

The Mesa Hydration Donation campaign, which began June 18, included two locations that offered the homeless a cool place to stay during the hottest part of the day. Word of Grace Church, located at 655 E. University, assisted approximately 250 people a week, including at least 40 women. Paz de Cristo, located at 424 W. Broadway Road, averaged 200 people daily.

For more information on the campaign, contact City of Mesa Human Services Specialist Lisa Wilson at 480-644-5831.



City of Mesa Library to host workshop on grant writing by azhttp
September 7, 2007, 8:33 pm
Filed under: City of Mesa, Mesa | Tags:

New grants make it possible for cash-strapped agencies to bring important services into the community and get innovative ideas off the ground. Yet, applying for and receiving grants is a very competitive process. To helpmembers of the nonprofit community and government agencies decipher the complexities of the grantseeking process, the City of Mesa Library will be hosting the Grantsmanship Training Program November 5-9 at the Main Library, 64 E. First St. The five-day workshop will be conducted by The Grantsmanship Center, the world’s oldest and largest training organization for the nonprofit sector.

“The Grantsmanship Center is widely recognized as the premier trainer in this new profession, providing an excellent week of experience for those wishing to learn the ‘brokering skills’ necessary for grants success,”

City of Mesa Grants Coordinator Jerry Dillehay said. “It was the first place I turned for outside training when I began my new career as Grants Coordinator for the City.”

Designed for both novice and experienced grantseekers, this workshop covers all aspects of searching for grants, writing grant proposals and negotiating with funding sources. Participants will work in teams to actually develop a grant proposal.

To ensure personal attention, registration is limited to 30 participants. The program fee of $875 includes workshop tuition and one year of TGCI membership benefits and services. Fifty percent scholarships may be available for organizations with annual operating budgets under $300,000.

To register for the workshop or apply for a scholarship, log onto www.tgci.com. For more information, contact Perla Anderson at the City of  Mesa Library at 480-644-3719.

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Upcoming Events at the Mesa Amphitheatre by quotes
August 29, 2007, 1:21 pm
Filed under: Art, Artists, Arts, Arts and Entertainment, City of Mesa, Entertainment, Mesa, Mesa Amphitheatre | Tags: ,

Join us for these upcoming events at the Mesa Amp:

Incubus –

Wednesday, September 5

Doors 4:30, Show 6:00 pm

Tickets: $43 in advance and day-of show

Produced by Luckyman Concerts

Win Free Tickets to the Incubus Concert from Urban Art –

Urban Art Tattoo Grand Opening (new location!) Tuesday, September 4th, 6pm – 8pm

443 West Main St. in Mesa

Live remote from The Edge with live

concert ticket giveaways!

Includes passes to the Amp VIP area, hosted by Urban Art

For more information call Urban Art at 480-844-7429 or visit www.urbanarttattoo.com

Rise Against

Thursday, September 6

Doors 4:30 pm, Show 5:30 pm

Tickets: $23 in advance

$ 25 day-of show

Produced by Luckyman Concerts

Lucky Dube

HELD IN CONVENTION CENTER, BLDG C

Friday, September 7

Doors 6:00 pm, Show 7:30 pm

Tickets: $35 in advance

$ 41 day-of show

Produced by 3-Brothers Reggae Showcase Ent

Muse

Thursday, September 20

Doors 5:00 pm, Show 6:30 pm

Tickets: $30 in advance and day-of

Produced by Luckyman Concerts

Shins

Tuesday, October 9

Doors 5:30 pm, Show 7:00 pm

Tickets: $28 in advance and day-of

Produced by Stateside Presents

For tickets, visit the Mesa Amphitheatre Box Office Mon. – Fri., 9:00 am – 4:00 pm Or at all Ticketmaster Outlets or by phone at 480-784-4444 or on-line at www.ticketmaster.com



Phoenix Housing Market by quotes

Greater Phoenix resale home market continues steady trend

MESA, Ariz. — The local resale housing market appears to be fairly stable, with 4,910 recorded sales in June 2007. The activity of June closely followed May 2007 at 5,220 sales and was not far below last year’s 5,460 transactions. The month of June brought the second quarter activity to a close with 14,990 sales, in contrast to 14,185 sales for the first quarter and last year’s second quarter sales of 18,310.

The current level of activity brings much needed sustainability; however, the 2007 year-to-date total of 29,175 homes is well below the 36,290 for 2006 year to date and 58,030 sales for 2005 year to date.

While the resale market is following a very traditional pattern, there are increasing risks that the market could move lower, driven by geopolitical risks and tighter mortgage underwriting guidelines,” said Jay Q. Butler, director of Realty Studies in ASU’s Morrison School of Management and Agribusiness at the Polytechnic campus. Both of these factors could make it increasingly difficult for people who desire another home to be able to finance it.

The new home market continues to be a competitive and attractive alternative to the resale home in many areas of the market as new home builders have been aggressively pursuing buyers through incentives such as specially priced up-grades, free pools and gift cards. Even with these concerns, the general expectation is that the 2007 resale housing market should be a good year, but nowhere near the records.

Much like the ever-increasing sales activity of the last few years, the rapid improvement in prices has disappeared. The median home price in June was $263,145 in comparison to $262,000 for May and last year’s $267,000.  For June 2007, 17 percent of all recorded sales were for homes priced from $125,000 to $199,999, 41 percent for $200,000 to $299,999 and 40 percent for homes priced over $300,000.  Last year, the distribution was 14 percent of all recorded sales were for homes priced from $125,000 to $199,999, 44 percent for $200,000 to $299,999 and 39 percent for homes priced over $300,000. Since the greater Phoenix area is so large, the median price can range significantly from $692,750 ($711,000 in May) in North Scottsdale to $148,500 ($158,500 in May) in the Sky Harbor area of the city of Phoenix.

Because mortgage interest rates decline slightly from last year’s 6.2 percent to 5.9 percent and home prices remained fairly stable, the monthly payment decreased slightly from last year’s $1,390 to $1,330. Even though mortgage interest rates have been declining over the last year, they have been in an upward trend for the last few months creating mounting concerns about the ability of some homeowners to acquire or maintain their homes. In response to issues raised in the subprime market, underwriting guidelines have been tightening, making it more difficult for potential buyers to qualify for a mortgage.

Townhouse/condominium units have retained some popularity with seasonal visitors, investors and people seeking affordable housing, so this housing sector showed an improvement from last year’s 1,035 sales to 1,125 sales for June 2007 (1,245 sales in May). Even with popularity, the median home price decreased slightly from $184,990 in May to $181,250.

The median square footage for a single-family home recorded sold in June 2007 was 1,725 square feet, which is larger than the 1,640 square feet for a year ago. The larger size further demonstrates the role of the move-up sector in the local housing market. In the townhouse/condominium sector, the median square footage was 1,105 square feet, which is larger than the 1,090 square feet reported a year ago.

  1. In contrast to June 2006, recorded sales in the city of Phoenix decreased from 1,725 sales to 1,320 sales, while the median sales price increased to $227,390 from $225,000 for a year ago. Since Phoenix is a geographically large city, the median price can range significantly such as $148,500 in the Sky Harbor area to $343,000 ($313,495 in May) in the Union Hills area. The townhouse/condominium sector increased from 300 to 370 sales, while the median price increased from $150,000 to $166,500.
  2. The Scottsdale resale home market declined from 465 to 415 recorded sales, along with the median sales price decreasing from last year’s $640,000 to $612,750. The median resale home price is $692,750 ($711,000 in May) in North Scottsdale and $316,000 ($320,000 in May) in South Scottsdale. The townhouse/condominium sector in Scottsdale stayed at 250 sales, while the median sales price decreased from $264,750 to $249,900.
  3. The Mesa resale housing market declined from 585 to 520 sales, while the median price fell from $247,600 to $235,000 ($238,000 in May). The townhouse/condominium sector also fell from 160 to 135 sales, while the median home price decreased from $156,250 to $154,465.
  4.                

  5. Glendale decreased from 430 to 325 sales and the median sales price decreased from $253,000 a year ago to $243,480 ($243,000 in May). The townhouse/condominium sector decreased from 70 to 50 sales, while the median sales price remained at $145,000.

       

·       For the city of Peoria, the resale market declined from 250 to 230 sales, while the median price moved from $272,900 to $255,000 ($255,000 in May). The townhouse/condominium sector decreased from 35 to 20 sales and the median price increased from $163,500 to $182,000.

  1. In comparison to a year ago, the Sun City resale market improved from 75 to 115 sales, while the median sales price decreased to $185,000 from $215,000. Resale activity in Sun City West remained at 45 sales, the median sales price decreased from $258,950 to $217,500. The townhouse/condominium market in Sun City remained stable at 45 recorded sales, while the median home price decreased from $143,250 to $127,750. In Sun City West, activity fell from 15 to 10 sales and the median sales price decreased from $178,000 to $175,500.
  2. The resale market in Gilbert decreased from 330 to 315 sales and the median sales price decreased from $330,000 to $297,000 ($300,000 in May). The townhouse/condominium market improved from 10 to 15 sales as the median sales price decreased from $238,750 to $189,900.

  • For the city of Chandler, the resale market fell from 380 to 370 recorded sales, while the median sales price went from $295,000 to $288,000 ($297,750 in May). The townhouse/condominium market increased from 40 to 45 sales, and the median sales price declined from $176,450 to $175,000.

§       The resale market in Tempe decreased from 160 to 140 sales, with the median sales price decreasing from $298,500 to $289,000 ($270,780 in May). The townhouse/condominium sector moved up from 70 to 95 sales, with the median sales price decreased from $191,000 to $183,000.

  1. The highest median sales price was in Paradise Valley at $1,932,500 with a median square foot house of 3,965 square feet.

·       In the West Valley, the following communities represent 10 percent of the resale market.

o       Avondale fell from 120 to 90 sales with the median price moving from $259,050 to $239,000 ($223,000 in May).

o       El Mirage decreased from 80 to 60 sales, while the median home price went from $215,000 to $195,500 ($200,000 in May).

o       Goodyear went from 90 to 80 sales, while the median price increased from $290,000 to $299,000 ($250,000 in May).

o       Surprise increased from 175 sales to 255 sales, while the median price decreased from $254,900 for a year ago to $230,000 ($245,070 in May).

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REalty studies

Realty Studies is associated with the Morrison School of Management and Agribusiness at Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus. Realty Studies collects and analyzes data concerning real estate in the greater Phoenix metropolitan area. Realty Studies is a comprehensive and objective source of real estate information for private, public and governmental agencies.  Its director, Dr. Jay Q. Butler, may be reached at (480) 727-1300 or e-mail him at Jay.Butler@asu.edu. To subscribe to RSS feed for Realty Studies news, visit http://www.poly.asu.edu/realty/rss.html.

ASU’s Polytechnic campus, located in southeast Mesa, offers bachelor and graduate degree programs, unparalleled by other Arizona state universities, through the Morrison School of Management and Agribusiness, the School of Applied Arts and Sciences, the School of Educational Innovation and Teacher Preparation, and the College of Technology and Innovation. Visit us online at http://www.east.asu.edu.



Rebate For Xeriscape landscaping instead of grass by quotes
June 28, 2007, 3:16 pm
Filed under: City of Mesa, Mesa | Tags: , ,

New rebate to encourage Xeriscape landscape instead of grass

Mesa water customers that replace their water-thirsty grass with low-water using plants will now be rewarded with cash back. The new Grass-to-Xeriscape Landscape Rebate, approved by the Mesa City Council on June 25, will encourage the use of landscape plants appropriate to our Sonoran Desert climate. The current owner of a single-family home can apply for a rebate of $500 for removing at least 500 square feet of grass. The new program takes effect July 25, and customers must qualify, which includes receiving prior approval from the City before removing the grass. A yearly budget of $50,000 has been set aside for the program, to be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis.

Since more than half of the water used by homeowners can often be spent on outdoor watering, converting from grass to an attractive low-water using landscape is one of the best ways to conserve water and energy, save money on your water bill, and create a landscape that is much easier to maintain. Local studies show that a Xeriscape landscape can use 50 to 60 percent less water than turf-style landscapes.

Xeriscape (zeer-a-scape) is a term that defines a creative approach to landscaping that includes the use of well-adapted plants, efficient irrigation, careful design and proper maintenance. Xeriscape also creates or replaces habitat needed by wildlife, and helps to create shade for people, our homes and our communities.

The new Grass-to-Xeriscape Rebate program replaces City Ordinance 5-17-8 (E), which provided a rebate of 10 to 25 percent of the water impact fee (paid at the time of construction), when specific low-water using landscapes were installed. The impact fee rebate was only available to customers whose homes were built in 1984 or later, so it did not offer any incentive to residents with older homes. Performing a landscape renovation, especially when it involves grass removal, is typically more costly, complex and difficult to accomplish than simply constructing a new landscape or replacing existing plants.

The City offers a number of publications to assist customers in their conversion from grass to Xeriscape, including Converting to Xeriscape, Landscape Plants for the Arizona Desert and Xeriscape: Landscaping with Style in the Arizona Desert. For a complete listing of available publications or to find out how to qualify for the Grass-to-Xeriscape Rebate, visit http://www.cityofmesa.org/utilities/conservation/ or call (480) 644-3306.



Kari Kent named Deputy City Manager by quotes
June 21, 2007, 8:50 pm
Filed under: City of Mesa, Mesa

Kari Kent named Deputy City Manager

Kari Kent, Neighborhood Services Director for the City of Mesa, has been =

selected as Mesa’s new Deputy City Manager. She replaces Paul Wenbert,=

who retired March 1. Kent’s appointment will be recommended to City =

Council at its June 25 meeting.

“Kari was chosen from among a strong pool of candidates across the country,” Mesa Assistant City Manager Debra Dollar said. “Ultimately= , she was selected as the top candidate because of her leadership and communication skills, solid work ethic, dedication to Mesa and passion to=

serve the community.”

Kent has worked with the City of Mesa for 14 years. She was promoted to =

Solid Waste Management Director in 1999 and Assistant Development Service= s Director in July 2001. She has been Neighborhood Services Director since=

November 2006. In this capacity, she oversees Code Compliance, Housing =

and Community Revitalization, Diversity Office, Neighborhood Outreach and=

Historic Preservation. Kent will continue as Acting Neighborhood Service= s Director until a replacement is named.

Kent received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Political Science from Northern Arizona University and a Masters of Public Administration from =

Arizona State University. She joins Deputy City Managers Bryan Raines an= d Jack Friedline in providing leadership oversight to the City’s many diverse divisions.



Mesa Southwest Museum by quotes
June 21, 2007, 8:45 pm
Filed under: Art, Arts, Arts and Entertainment, City of Mesa, Mesa, Museum | Tags:

“Your Healer Within” exhibit at Mesa Southwest Museum

It is a fun human body show for the whole family! Mesa Southwest Museum =

will be hosting “Your Healer Within,” a new temporary exhibit that op= ens June 23 and continues until September 9. The exhibit focuses on the science of self-healing and self-directed wellness and looks at health =

issues you should know at every stage of life from the cradle to the grave. It features numerous inter-active tools including:

· A virtual reality tour through the immune system

· “Boarding Around Town” which has a model skeleton skateboarding=

to

music of your choice

· A virtual pond which lets you move water and melt ice with your

hand

· “Cell Warrior” which lets you imagine yourself as a white blood=

cell to help the body heal

“Your Healer Within” is a public education project of A.T. Still University in Mesa. For more than 100 years, A.T. Still University has =

been educating compassionate healthcare professionals. The University =

loaned the exhibit to the City free of charge.

“We are thrilled to collaborate with A.T. Still University to bring thi= s exciting and innovative exhibition to the City,” Mesa Southwest Museum =

Curator of Education Kathy Eastman said. The museum is the first stop fo= r the exhibit, which will be on a national tour for at least five years. =

For more information on the exhibit, contact Kathy Eastman at 480-644-566=

2

or log onto www.cityofmesa.org/swmuseum/. For more information about A.T=Still University, log onto www.atsu.edu.