Phoenix Arizona


Phoenix Arizona Diabetes Expo by quotes
Volunteer and Networking Opportunity
posted Tuesday, April 15, 2008 11:21 PM
by ,

ARIZONA Below is a possible opportunity for connecting to employers, volunteers and other job seekers on an upcoming weekend. Volunteering provides an opportunity to connect with lots of other people with similar interests and this particular event had about 5000 attendees last year.

Diabetes Expo

Diabetes Expo Phoenix – American Diabetes Expo

PHOENIX Arizona — On Saturday, April 26, 2008, the American Diabetes Association will once again host the free Diabetes Expo—an annual, one-day event showcasing the latest products and services for people affected by diabetes. This highly interactive Diabetes Expo event includes activities for people of all ages, including a fun Youth Zone with exciting activities and information for children with diabetes and their families. The Diabetes Expo also provides the public with a unique opportunity to talk with health care experts and obtain important medical and nutrition information.

“If you or a loved one has diabetes – or is at high risk of developing the disease – Diabetes Expo provides a fun, relaxed environment to learn a great deal about the important aspects of prevention and management of diabetes and its serious complications,” said Howard Shulman, DO, FACP, FACOI, Diabetes Expo Chair. “The Diabetes Expo is for all people affected by diabetes, as well as anyone interested in healthy eating and active living.”

Diabetes is the nation’s fifth deadliest disease, and it has no cure. In 2005, there were approximately 469,000 residents of Arizona who self-identified as having diabetes, nearly 7.5 percent of the total population (Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, 2005). Diabetes can lead to serious complications and premature death, but people with diabetes can take steps to manage the disease and lower the risk of complications. Early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes is critical. Unfortunately, many people living with diabetes do not even know it.

More than 75 exhibitors are participating in the 12th annual ADA Diabetes Expo in Phoenix, which will be held Saturday, April 26 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Phoenix Convention Center, Halls F & G (33 S. Third St. in Phoenix, Arizona 85004). Admission is Free. Stop by “ADA World” and participate in interactive cooking demonstrations, live Web site demonstrations, and find out how the American Diabetes Association is helping people with diabetes and their families in your community.

For more information about diabetes or the Diabetes Expo, call 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or visit the Arizona Diabetes Expo site.

When: Saturday, April 26, 2008
Where: Phoenix Convention Center
Exhibit Halls F & G
33 S. Third St.
Phoenix, Arizona 85004 – Map and directions.

Time: 8:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

The American Diabetes Association is the nation’s leading voluntary health organization supporting diabetes research, information and advocacy. Founded in 1940, the Association has offices in every region of the country, providing services to hundreds of communities.



Biomedical Sciences at ASU by quotes

Bee researcher at Arizona State University is one of 20 new Pew Scholars in the biomedical sciences

TEMPE, Ariz.– It’s hard to imagine, for most of us, that the bees we see buzzing between strands of orange flowers of the desert mallow could potentially usher in a medical breakthrough. However, in the right hands, these insects best known for their banded coloration, social life and skills with pollination could some day be the key to advancements in biomedical neuroscience of aging – if Gro Amdam has her way, with support from The Pew Charitable Trusts.
 
Amdam, an assistant professor in Arizona State University’s School of Life Sciences who heads social insect studies in laboratories at both ASU and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences’ Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences, is one of only 20 researchers chosen this year to enter the Trusts’ exclusive rolls as a Pew Scholar in the biomedical sciences. About 150 eligible colleges across the nation were invited to submit a candidate for the award this year. Remarkably, it was the first year that Arizona State University was invited to participate and Amdam was the sole candidate put forward by ASU President Michael M. Crow.
 
“The focus of this award – biomedical sciences – is an evolving area of emphasis for ASU,” says Crow. “The fact that the award is going to a researcher using the honeybee as a biomedical model exemplifies the spirit of ASU unconstrained by disciplinary boundaries.”
 
Robert Page, founding director of ASU’s School of Life Sciences and Amdam’s oft-time collaborator in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, says he never had any doubt that the Pew Trusts would select Amdam, and that the award has special significance on several fronts: “This the first year that ASU was invited to nominate, so it marks our initiation as an institution into this select ’club.’ The fact that our faculty member was chosen also shows that ASU belongs in the club. Then, when you consider that this award is in the area of biomedical science and will support research using honeybees … it shows just how much the world of biology is changing and that comparative biology will be central even to the biomedical sciences.”
 
The Pew Charitable Trusts is composed of seven separate trusts established between 1948 and 1979 by the heirs of Joseph N. Pew, founder of the Sun Oil Company, and is driven by the power of knowledge to solve today’s most challenging problems. Pew applies a rigorous, analytical approach to improve public policy, inform the public and stimulate civic life. It partners with a diverse range of donors, public and private organizations and concerned citizens who share its commitment to fact-based solutions and goal-driven investments to improve society.



“The Pew Scholars are among America’s finest biomedical research entrepreneurs. They seek out and mine unexpected leads in a quest for knowledge that may one day lead to new medical treatments and save lives,” says Rebecca W. Rimel, president and chief executive office of The Pew Charitable Trusts.



As a Pew Scholar, Amdam will receive a $240,000 award over four years to help support her research.



Among past Pew Scholars are Nobel Prize winners, such as Craig Mello from the University of Massachusetts, who shared the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine with Stanford’s Andrew Fire for their development of the RNA interference (RNAi) technique. Amdam’s research will make use of RNAi to study genes implicated in plasticity of honeybee neuronal aging.


Of the award, Amdam says, “In the scholarly system of Norway, where I come from, such recognitions are very rare, nearly unheard of. This is a great honor for me.” She also notes, “The award gives me a unique opportunity to take my research at ASU into the field of neuroscience, and neurogerontology in particular.”
 
According to Amdam, her Pew project will join two lines of study that have never been coupled: the emerging field of honeybee comparative neurogerontology – in which Amdam has published the first work on plasticity of neuronal oxidative damage – and honeybee behavioral physiology, where cumulative data show that age-related cell damage can be reversed. Amdam has authored or coauthored publications in Nature, Public Library of Science Biology, Advances in Cancer Research, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Experimental Gerontology and Behavioral Brain Research in the past year, laying the foundation for this work. Her group has documented that social reversal, which triggers old bees (that usually forage outside of the hive) to revert to tasks normally performed by younger bees (that nurse larvae within the hive), is associated with reversal of several physiological markers of senescence. Her findings, and supporting findings from other groups, Amdam says, indicate that “behavioral reversal triggers a systemic response, one which translates into a unique cascade of cell repair in bees.” Preliminary data collected in her laboratory suggest that this cascade can include the central nervous system.
 
“If social reversal causes arrest or partial clearance of neuronal oxidative damage, my project funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts will establish the first model for neuronal oxidative remission,” Amdam notes.
 
Oxidative brain damage is a fundamental pathology in normal human aging and in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, and development of novel treatments has high priority in biomedical research, says Amdam. Although she describes this line of discovery as risky, “its prospective contribution is of considerable relevance for human health.” 
 



Historic Phoenix Union High School Re-Opens as State-of-the-Art Biomedical Campus by quotes

Historic Phoenix Union High School Re-Opens as State-of-the-Art Biomedical Campus

The city of Phoenix in collaboration with the University of Arizona College of Medicine, the state of Arizona and Arizona State University opened the new Phoenix Biomedical Campus.

More here: Phoenix Biomedical Campus



Healthy Lifestyles Promoted at Phoenix’s Brindar a tu Salud (Cheers to Your Health) by quotes

Healthy Lifestyles Promoted at Phoenix’s Brindar a tu Salud (Cheers to Your Health)The city of Phoenix Parks and Recreation Department’s Washington Adult Center will be hosting a free family health and safety fair titled Brindar a tu Salud (Cheers to Your Health) on Aug. 5 from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. The Washington Adult Center is located at 2240 W. Citrus Way (near the intersection of Glendale and 21st avenues).

Brindar a tu Salud will feature free medical screenings and information booths with nutritional fun facts and summer survival techniques. Individuals attending the event also will be able to get free immunizations, refreshments and learn CPR and water safety.

The event also will feature fun activities that will get children involved in, and excited about their own health and nutrition including fingerprinting, safety tips, and fun food games involving gelatos, Jell-O eating, a gigantic food pyramid game, and fruit faces.

Event participants will receive free raffle tickets that are good for free visits to the Walk-In Medical Clinic and discount coupons that may be used at the clinic for school and sports physicals. The entire family is invited to come out and learn the easy steps to having a happy, healthy summer.

Those interested can call 602-262-6971 for more information.