Phoenix Arizona


Flu Shots – Locating Flu Shot Clinics by quotes

Community Information and Referral has made it easy again this year to find flu shot clinics. Simply go to their website or call the 24 hour seven day per week flu shot hotline and you will find a clinic conveniently located near you.

CIR News: Flu Shots Available Now!

It’s that time of year again, and Community Information & Referral has the latest news on where you can get flu shots.

We’ve made it easier for you to find flu shot clinics near you by indexing flu shot providers by the counties they serve and by what kind of insurance they accept.

For more information, please visit us online at: http://flu.cir.org/

This is a newsletter from Community Information & Referral in Phoenix, Arizona.

Please visit us on the web at http://www.cir.org
Or call us 24/7!
602-263-8856 from anywhere
800-352-3792 from area codes 520 & 928

Get Help/Give Help.
Search our online Directory of Human Services & Self-Help Support Groups

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Community Information & Referral Board of Directors by quotes

Phoenix Arizona – Community Information & Referral (CIR), a local non-profit, recently elected officers for its 2008-2009. The new officers are:

Chair, Bill Austin, Vice President of Business Development, Arizona High Tech Talent Partnership

Vice-Chair, Jerry Mendoza, Low Income Assistance Program Manager, Arizona Public Service

Treasurer, Blossom Aung, Program Business Manager, General Dynamics,

Shelley Detwiller Digiacomo, Attorney, Osborn Maledon.

Art Brooks, President/CEO, Arizona Broadcasters Association was recently elected to the board.

Community Information & Referral (CIR) provides FREE 24-hour Help Hotline services to Arizona residents. Trained Information & Referral Specialists respond to calls from people who need help finding help, assess problems, and provide appropriate information and/or referrals to local governmental, non-profit, and faith-based health and human services organizations. Callers can reach the Hot Helpline in Maricopa County by calling 602-263-8856, or outside Maricopa County, toll free at 1-800-352-3792. Visit us on the web at http://www.cir.org/ and see below for a complete listing.

Special Programs

Community Information & Referral offers several specialized programs for residents of Arizona. Please click on the name of the programs below to find out more about them including contact information.

24-Hour Helpline
Our English/Spanish bilingual Information & Referral Specialists are ready to help you 24 hours a day to assist you in finding the help you need. We are central and northern Arizona’s First Call for Help. Call 602-263-8856 from anywhere or 1-800-352-3792 within area codes 520 & 928.

Childhood Immunization Hotline (Maricopa County only)
We refer callers living in Maricopa County to the closest clinic where they can get free immunizations for their children age 18 and under. Call 602-263-8856.

Community Voice MailCommunity Voice Mail
Community Voice Mail assists homeless individuals in Maricopa County by giving them private telephone numbers to help them with job searches and keeping connected to family and friends. All clients must be referred by agencies that provide direct services to homeless individuals and/or families. Call 602-263-8845 x 108.

CONTACSCONTACS
The COmmunity NeTwork for ACcessing Shelter helps domestic violence victims and homeless persons in Maricopa County find shelter in emergency situations 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Call 602-263-8900 or 1-800-799-7739.

HIV CAREHIV CARE
HIV CARE is a confidential 24-hour information line for helping people with HIV/AIDS who need medical care. People can also get help with food, dental, counseling, social services and treatment. Services are available in English and Spanish. No insurance is required. Call 1-877-HIV-7020 or 1-800-448-7020.

HMISMaricopa HMIS (Homeless Management Information System) Project
Assessing services provided to and unmet needs of homeless individuals in Maricopa County. This program is presented in cooperation with several agencies with support from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

Arizona Mortgage Foreclosure HelplineArizona Mortgage Foreclosure Helpline
With thousands of Arizonans facing foreclosure on their homes, Community Information & Referral has partnered with the Arizona Department of Housing to guide those people to agencies that can help them through the process and might be able to help them stay in their homes. Call 1-877-448-1211. Foreclosure Prevention

Valley LifelineValley Lifeline
In partnership with Lifeline Systems Inc., the nation’s leading provider of personal emergency response services, we provide a way to help people remain independent in their own homes while maintaining a constant link to immediate emergency services should the need arise. This service is especially helpful to senior citizens and people with disabilities who might otherwise require constant supervision in an environment outside their homes. Call 602-263-8845.

Community Information & Referral Board of Directors



Phoenix Arizona Diabetes Expo by quotes
Volunteer and Networking Opportunity
posted Tuesday, April 15, 2008 11:21 PM
by ,

ARIZONA Below is a possible opportunity for connecting to employers, volunteers and other job seekers on an upcoming weekend. Volunteering provides an opportunity to connect with lots of other people with similar interests and this particular event had about 5000 attendees last year.

Diabetes Expo

Diabetes Expo Phoenix – American Diabetes Expo

PHOENIX Arizona — On Saturday, April 26, 2008, the American Diabetes Association will once again host the free Diabetes Expo—an annual, one-day event showcasing the latest products and services for people affected by diabetes. This highly interactive Diabetes Expo event includes activities for people of all ages, including a fun Youth Zone with exciting activities and information for children with diabetes and their families. The Diabetes Expo also provides the public with a unique opportunity to talk with health care experts and obtain important medical and nutrition information.

“If you or a loved one has diabetes – or is at high risk of developing the disease – Diabetes Expo provides a fun, relaxed environment to learn a great deal about the important aspects of prevention and management of diabetes and its serious complications,” said Howard Shulman, DO, FACP, FACOI, Diabetes Expo Chair. “The Diabetes Expo is for all people affected by diabetes, as well as anyone interested in healthy eating and active living.”

Diabetes is the nation’s fifth deadliest disease, and it has no cure. In 2005, there were approximately 469,000 residents of Arizona who self-identified as having diabetes, nearly 7.5 percent of the total population (Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, 2005). Diabetes can lead to serious complications and premature death, but people with diabetes can take steps to manage the disease and lower the risk of complications. Early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes is critical. Unfortunately, many people living with diabetes do not even know it.

More than 75 exhibitors are participating in the 12th annual ADA Diabetes Expo in Phoenix, which will be held Saturday, April 26 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Phoenix Convention Center, Halls F & G (33 S. Third St. in Phoenix, Arizona 85004). Admission is Free. Stop by “ADA World” and participate in interactive cooking demonstrations, live Web site demonstrations, and find out how the American Diabetes Association is helping people with diabetes and their families in your community.

For more information about diabetes or the Diabetes Expo, call 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or visit the Arizona Diabetes Expo site.

When: Saturday, April 26, 2008
Where: Phoenix Convention Center
Exhibit Halls F & G
33 S. Third St.
Phoenix, Arizona 85004 – Map and directions.

Time: 8:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

The American Diabetes Association is the nation’s leading voluntary health organization supporting diabetes research, information and advocacy. Founded in 1940, the Association has offices in every region of the country, providing services to hundreds of communities.



Tips to Stay Safe in the Heat by quotes

 Tips to Stay Safe in the HeatCommunity Information & Referral

or Call: (602) 263-8856

As temperatures begin to rise well over 100 degrees, the city of Phoenix Emergency Management Program, in cooperation with the state, Maricopa County, and nonprofit and faith-based organizations, is prepared to take action to ensure the safety of its residents.Both the Fire and Police departments will respond to heat emergencies and provide water during extreme heat warnings. The Human Services Department is offering heat stress training seminars for its meal delivery aides, minibus operators and caseworkers for seniors who come in contact with the elderly.

“The best advice we can give to residents is to stay hydrated, especially when you go outside during the day. And please keep a special eye on your neighbors, particularly the elderly,” said Mayor Phil Gordon.“Phoenix also is working closely with nonprofit and faith-based organizations that are helping with outreach efforts to the homeless,” he said.

DonationsThrough the city’s annual Summer Respite Program, the public is asked to donate unopened water bottles, sunscreen, new underwear, white socks, white T-shirts and prepackaged snack items that will be distributed to the homeless. Tax-deductible donations may be delivered to the city’s four Family Services Centers: Travis L. Williams, 4732 S. Central Ave., 602-534-4732; John F. Long, 3454 N. 51st Ave., 602-262-6510; Central Phoenix, 1250 S. Seventh Ave., 602-534-1250; and Sunnyslope, 914 W. Hatcher Road, 602-495-5229. The centers are open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday – Friday.

The city partners with 10 local homeless outreach teams to distribute these items. They include Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development, Stand Up for Kids, Community Bridges, HomeBase Youth Services, Connection to Care Team, The Salvation Army Project HOPE, Health Care for the Homeless, TERROS, Southwest Behavioral Health Service PATH Outreach and US Vets.City staff is working with faith-based organizations in the metropolitan area to provide heat assistance in the areas of hydration and respite efforts and wellness checks. They will help collect, store and distribute bottled water; provide a cool, safe place for people to escape the heat; and check on the elderly and disabled to make sure they have access to cool and safe places. City staff is providing training and information to these volunteers. Any faith-based organizations interested in assisting can call 602-262-4520.

St. Mary’s Food Bank also will assist the city in storing large quantities of water during the summer months. Any company or group interested in donating water or contributing funds to buy water can call the Human Services Department at 602-262-4520.The Human Services Campus Day Resource Center will provide services and respite for homeless individuals in downtown Phoenix. The Phoenix Rescue Mission will offer day respite, meals and shelter at its 35th Avenue location and United Methodist Outreach Ministries will provide additional day and night shelter for women and families. Residents needing further information about these services can call Community Information and Referral at 602-263-8856.

Tips to keep cool and healthy during times of extreme heatEven healthy people should take it easy during extremely high temperatures, and those with respiratory and other health problems must be especially careful. Stay out of the sun as much as possible. Drink extra fluids, but avoid alcoholic beverages. Alcohol can cause dehydration. The best ways to prevent a sun stress emergency are:

  • Drink before you’re thirsty and drink often.Eat a healthy diet.

  • Wear a hat or cap, keep the neck covered and wear loose fitting clothing. The greatest amount of heat loss from the body occurs at the head. This is why it is important to wear a hat or cap in the sun.
  • If you can, work in the cool hours of the day or evening.

According to the Phoenix Fire Department, heat-related injuries fall into three major categories:

  • Heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms that occur when the body loses electrolytes during profuse sweating or when inadequate electrolytes are taken into the body. They usually begin in the arms, legs or abdomen, and often precede heat exhaustion. Treatment for heat cramps is to rest in the shade, get near a fan, spray the person with water and massage the cramp.
  • Heat exhaustion is a medical emergency. When a person is suffering from heat exhaustion, they will perspire profusely and most likely will be pale. It is best treated by taking the patient to a cool place, applying cool compresses, elevating the feet and giving the patient fluids.
  • Heatstroke is the worst heat-related injury. The brain has lost its ability to regulate body temperature. The patient will be hot, reddish and warm to the touch. Their temperature will be markedly high and there will be no perspiration. This is a medical emergency: call 9-1-1. The emergency care of heatstroke is to cool the body as quickly as possible. One of the best methods for cooling the body during a heat emergency is to wrap the patient in cool, wet sheets.

Tips to avoid heat related illness:

  • Never leave infants, children or pets inside a parked vehicle.
  • Increase fluid intake, regardless of activity level. Don’t wait until thirsty to drink fluids; drink more liquid than one’s thirst indicates.
  • Avoid “heat hangover.” Continue to drink fluids even after strenuous activity. This will enable the body to maintain optimum hydration, and help prevent the after effects of heat exposure such as headaches and fatigue.
  • Avoid beverages containing alcohol, caffeine or large amounts of sugar as they dehydrate the body.
  • Avoid very cold beverages as they cause stomach cramps.
  • Limit exercise or outdoor activity between the hours of 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. when the sun is at its peak intensity. If active during this time frame, drink a minimum of 16 to 32 ounces of water each hour.
  • Some medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, may increase the risk of heat related illness. Consult your physician if you have questions.
  • Take advantage of free air conditioning! Visit shopping malls, movie theaters or the library to escape the heat for a few hours.

Outdoor protection:

  • When outdoors, wear a sunscreen with a minimum SPF15. Apply at least 30 minutes prior to going outdoors and re-apply as necessary.
  • Rest frequently in shady areas so that the body’s temperature has a chance to recover.
  • If unaccustomed to working or exercising in a hot environment, gradually increase the pace and limit exercise or work time.

Clothing:

  • Wear lightweight, loose-fitting clothing.
  • Wear sunglasses to protect the eyes.
  • Use a wide-brimmed hat to provide shade and keep the head cool.
  • Take special precaution with infants and young children by dressing them in loose, cool clothing and shading their heads

Cars and HeatWhen temperatures reach 100 degrees Fahrenheit, even with a window partially open, the temperature inside a car can reach 138 degrees in five minutes and up to 150 degrees in 15 minutes. In these conditions, children can die very quickly – in a matter of minutes. Infants and small children are particularly vulnerable due to their body configurations. The younger the child, the faster the onset of heatstroke and dehydration.

  • 75 percent of the temperature rise occurs within five minutes of closing and leaving the car.
  • 90 percent of the temperature rise occurs within 15 minutes.
  • Dark colored cars reach slightly higher temperatures than light colored cars.
  • The greater the amount of glass in the car (hatchbacks, etc.) the faster the rise in temperature.
  • Larger cars heat up just as fast as smaller cars.
  • Having the windows down even one inch causes only a slight temperature drop.

Additional Information



Historic Phoenix Union High School Re-Opens as State-of-the-Art Biomedical Campus by quotes

Historic Phoenix Union High School Re-Opens as State-of-the-Art Biomedical Campus

The city of Phoenix in collaboration with the University of Arizona College of Medicine, the state of Arizona and Arizona State University opened the new Phoenix Biomedical Campus.

More here: Phoenix Biomedical Campus



Chemed Announces VITAS Exiting Phoenix Hospice Market by quotes

Chemed Announces

VITAS Exiting

Phoenix Hospice Market

Chemed Corporation (Chemed) (NYSE:CHE), which operates VITAS Healthcare Corporation (VITAS), the nations largest provider of end-of-life care, and Roto-Rooter, the nations largest commercial and residential plumbing and drain cleaning services provider, today reported on several issues impacting operating results for the third quarter of 2006.

The Company announced VITAS is exiting the hospice market in Phoenix, Arizona. VITAS has been successful in growing admissions of terminally ill patients who reside primarily in assisted living settings within the Phoenix community. Patients residing in these types of facilities tend to exit curative care and enter into hospice relatively early into their terminal illness diagnosis. The current Medicare hospice reimbursement program limits payment for hospice care when a significant portion of the patient census enters into hospice early into their terminal diagnosis. Although VITAS, on average, has relatively short average and median lengths-of-stay in the majority of its programs, each program is measured separately and cannot be considered in aggregate of its hospice programs under common control and ownership.

The Phoenix program currently provides hospice care to approximately 200 terminally ill patients per day. Revenue and operating losses for Phoenix in the first six months of 2006 aggregated $3.0 million and $0.9 million, respectively, including $1.7 million of revenue reduction for Medicare billing limitations, or Medicare Cap. Full-year revenue and operating loss projections for Phoenix are estimated at $3.7 million and $4.3 million, including $6.3 million in revenue reductions for Medicare Cap. The after-tax cost to exit the Phoenix market, excluding the operating losses noted above, is estimated to range from $4.5 to $5.5 million.

VITAS announced in the second quarter of 2006 that two programs, excluding Phoenix, were anticipated to be in contractual billing limitations with Medicare in calendar year 2006. Based upon current trends, the total Medicare Cap for these two programs in calendar year 2006 is estimated to range between $4.7 and $7.6 million, with $0.6 million being recorded in the second quarter of 2006, $2.0 million to $3.0 million estimated to be recorded in the third quarter of 2006 and $2.1 million to $4.0 million to be recorded in the fourth quarter of the year. These estimates assume a modest deterioration in admission and discharge metrics in these two programs through the end of 2006. These two programs are estimated to generate over $3 million in operating profit in 2006.

The third-quarter 2006 Medicare Cap accrual will also include an additional $1.0 million for estimated prior-year billing limitations resulting from the Fiscal Intermediary reallocating admissions for deceased Medicare patients who received hospice care from multiple providers. Of this prior-year billing, $0.5 million is for one of the programs noted above and $0.5 million is estimated for a program not anticipated to have a billing restriction in calendar year 2006.

VITAS also released interim third quarter operating metrics. Through July and August 2006, VITAS had an Average Daily Census of 11,194, an increase of 9.7%, and admissions growth of 4.2%, when compared to the equivalent prior year period. August 2006 year-to-date ADC and admissions, excluding Phoenix, have increased 10.6% and 5.3%, respectively.

Chemed announced that it has reached a preliminary agreement in regard to litigation related to the divestiture of its Patient Care business segment. As part of this agreement, the company will convert $2.6 million of the current receivable due from Patient Care into a promissory note due October 2007. This note will bear interest quarterly at a 9.5% annual interest rate. The company will take an after-tax charge of $1.7 million representing a write-off of the remaining receivable balance as well as costs associated with certain contingent insurance claims and other items related to the Patient Care business. Chemed received Patient Care warrants with a value of $1.4 million at the time of the divestiture. The company has determined the valuation of these warrants is impaired. This impairment will result in a third quarter 2006 after-tax charge of $0.9 million.

Guidance for 2006

VITAS is estimated to generate full-year revenue growth from continuing operations, prior to Medicare Cap, of 14.0% to 14.5%, increased admissions of 5.0% to 5.5%, increased ADC of 10.0% to 11.0% and adjusted EBITDA margins, prior to Medicare Cap, of 12.9% to 13.2%. This guidance assumes a Medicare price increase that will average 3.8% in the fourth quarter of 2006.

Full-year Medicare contractual billing limitations, excluding Phoenix, which is anticipated to be classified as a discontinued operation in 2006, are estimated to range from $5.7 million to $8.6 million, which equates to revenue reduction of 80 to 120 basis points.

Roto-Rooter is estimated to generate a 6.0% to 7.0% increase in revenue in 2006, job count growth between 0.5% and 1.0% and adjusted EBITDA margins averaging between 16.5% and 17.0%.

Based upon these factors, an effective tax rate of 39% and average diluted share count of 26.7 million in the second half of 2006, our expectation is that full-year 2006 earnings per diluted share from continuing operations, excluding any charges or credits not indicative of ongoing operations, and excluding expense for stock options, will be in the range of $2.00 to $2.10. This earnings per share guidance includes $.13 to $.20 for the after-tax impact of Medicare Cap related to continuing operations.

Conference Call

Chemed will host a conference call and webcast at 9:00 a.m., ET, on Friday, September 29, 2006, to discuss this press release and provide an update on its business. The dial-in number for the conference call is (800) 561-2601 for U.S. and Canadian participants and (617) 614-3518 for international participants. The participant pass code is 50409048. A live webcast of the call can be accessed on Chemed’s website at www.chemed.com by clicking on Investor Relations Home.

A taped replay of the conference call will be available beginning approximately two hours after the call’s conclusion. It can be accessed by dialing (888) 286-8010 for U.S. and Canadian callers and (617) 801-6888 for international callers and will be available for one week following the live call. The replay pass code is 79291237. An archived webcast will also be available at www.chemed.com and will remain available for 14 days following the live call.

Chemed Corporation operates in the healthcare field through its VITAS Healthcare Corporation subsidiary. VITAS provides daily hospice services to over 11,000 patients with severe, life-limiting illnesses. This type of care is focused on making the terminally ill patient’s final days as comfortable and pain-free as possible.

Chemed operates in the residential and commercial plumbing and drain cleaning industry under the brand name Roto-Rooter. Roto-Rooter provides plumbing and drain service through company-owned branches, independent contractors and franchisees in the United States and Canada. Roto-Rooter also has licensed master franchisees in Indonesia, Singapore, Japan, Mexico, and the Philippines.

Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements contained in this press release and the accompanying tables are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. The words “believe,” “expect,” “hope,” “anticipate,” “plan” and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date the statement was made. Chemed does not undertake and specifically disclaims any obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. These statements are based on current expectations and assumptions and involve various risks and uncertainties, which could cause Chemed’s actual results to differ from those expressed in such forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties arise from, among other things, possible changes in regulations governing the hospice care or plumbing and drain cleaning industries; periodic changes in reimbursement levels and procedures under Medicare and Medicaid programs; difficulties predicting patient length of stay and estimating potential Medicare reimbursement obligations; challenges inherent in Chemed’s growth strategy; the current shortage of qualified nurses, other healthcare professionals and licensed plumbing and drain cleaning technicians; Chemeds dependence on patient referral sources; and other factors detailed under the caption “Description of Business by Segment” or “Risk Factors” in Chemeds most recent report on form 10-Q or 10-K and its other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements and there are no assurances that the matters contained in such statements will be achieved.



Gila River Indian Community Tribe donates to Mesa children’s group by quotes

Tribe donates to Mesa children’s group

Executive Director of the East Valley Child Crisis Center (EVCCC) Chris Scarpati accepted a grant from the Gila River Indian Community’s Chief of Staff Greg Mendoza at last night’s City Council meeting.

The grant, totaling $225,000 over three years, will be used to help construct a Family Resource Center/Children’s Behavioral Health Expansion building at 805 N. Country Club Dr.  The new building will increase the EVCCC’s capacity to bring two children’s programs together in one location.  The new center will allow the EVCCC to boost its services and clients by 50% by 2012.

“We are extremely grateful to have the tribe’s involvement as we reach out to serve more families,” said Scarpati.  “This partnership will be an enormous benefit to those we serve.”

The Family Resource Center (FRC) is a primary prevention program provider that promotes the well being of our community through the provision of voluntary services designed to keep children and families healthy and self-sufficient.

Proposition 202, passed by Arizona voters in Nov. 2002 allowed for new gaming compacts between the State of Arizona and 17 Arizona tribal governments.  Of the state shared revenue generated from these compacts, 12% can be retained by the Indian Community/Nation and distributed directly to local governments to benefit the general public.  Local non-profit organizations, such as the Child Crisis Center are allowed to access this grant funding if they secure an endorsement from their local government.  The City of Mesa was pleased to support the Child Crisis Center in this effort.