Phoenix Arizona


Free Income Tax Preparation – EITC by quotes

Volunteer tax preparers and translators needed for Earned Income Tax Credit initiative

For Other Free Income Tax Preparation locations contact Community Information & Referral at 01-602-263-8856

Tempe, Arizona – Volunteer tax preparers and translators are needed at free income tax assistance sites in Tempe and Guadalupe on Saturdays from January 26 to April 12, 2008.

The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), created by Congress, returns money from overpayment of taxes to workers with modest incomes. Free tax preparation and electronic filing are provided by volunteers as part of a coalition of Tempe Community Council, City of Tempe, Newtown Community Development Corporation, Tempe Schools Credit Union and the IRS. Since the coalition was initiated five years ago, volunteers have helped bring nearly $7.4 million in EITC refunds to working families.

Tax preparers must complete an IRS course in tax law and pass an IRS test. This year, the 5-week tax law course will be offered from 6-9 p.m.

on Nov. 15, Nov. 29, Dec. 6, Dec. 11 and Dec. 13 at Tempe Schools Credit Union, 2800 S. Mill Ave., Tempe.

Translators need not know tax terms.

For more information, visit www.tempe.gov/tcc/taxhelp/ or call the EITC Hotline at 480-858-2323.



Library showcases senior artwork by azhttp

TEMPE, Ariz. – “Visions of Arizona: People, Places and Things from our own

experiences,” the 2007 senior art exhibition will be on display from

8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday (except on city-observed holidays), from

Oct. 25 through Jan. 24 in the Public Library Second Floor Gallery, 3500 S.

Rural Road.

Admission is free.

This exhibition features Tempe senior artists from five city-sponsored art

classes at the Pyle Adult Recreation Center. The classes provide the

opportunity for individuals to enhance their skills and experiment with new

and traditional techniques and materials.

The students come from widely varied backgrounds and all parts of the world.

Nearly all of these students have found their creativity to be a source of

deep personal satisfaction and growth, keeping them young in both mind and

heart.

Artists display work in acrylic, oil, water color, colored pencil and other

drawing media. This year’s exhibit is a collection of artwork designed from

artists’ personal “Arizona” experiences.

Information: http://www.tempe.gov/arts/exhibitions/Library.htm or call

480/350-5211

<http://www.tempe.gov/arts/exhibitions/Library.htm%20or%20call%20480/350

-5211> .

Tempe galleries are operated and maintained by the city of Tempe Cultural

Services Division.



Tempe’s 30th Annual Family Halloween Carnival by azhttp

Tempe’s 30th Annual Halloween Carnival a treat for all

Families invited to the best “monster mash” in town

TEMPE, Ariz. – Don’t get spooked this Halloween! Come to one of the most

exciting and safe places in the Valley to celebrate Halloween with your

family. Tempe’s 30th Annual Family Halloween Carnival will be Wednesday,

Oct. 31, from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at Kiwanis Community Park, 6005 S.

All-America Way (Mill Avenue and All-America Way).

Some spooktacular highlights include entertainment, food, face painting,

carnival games and a 7:30 p.m. costume contest for goblins of all ages.

Local groups will provide live entertainment.

Admission is free and is offered to Valley families as a safe alternative to

trick-or-treating. Carnival tickets are 25 cents each, and proceeds will

benefit non-profit groups around the state.

More than 5,000 families are expected to attend this year’s event, and Tempe

hopes that number will grow even more in the years to come.

For more information visit www.tempe.gov/events or call the City of Tempe

Parks and Recreation Office at 480-350-5200. Text telephone/TDD is available

at 480-350-5050.



Book Sale – Friends of the Library by quotes

Book Sale – Friends of the Tempe Public LibraryCity of Tempe

480-350-5599

Book sale at Tempe Public Library

TEMPE, Ariz. – Purchase paperback and hardcover books for children and adults at the Tempe Public Library on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 10 a.m. to

2 p.m. The Friends of the Tempe Public Library is holding its annual Fall Book Sale in the Program Room on the lower lever, used book sales at bargain prices, with selections ranging from classics to recent bestsellers. A selection of audio-visual items will also be available.

The event will begin with a special Members Only sale from 9-10 a.m.

Community members who wish to become a member of the Friends may purchase a membership on the day of the sale. The sale will be open to the general public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Friends of the Tempe Public Library is a non-profit organization that sponsors library programs for adults and children, purchases library equipment and furnishings, and promotes the library’s activities.

The Tempe Public Library is located at 3500 S. Rural Road. For more information on the book sale or purchasing a membership, call the Friends of the Tempe Public Library at 480-350-5599.



Tempe City Council hosts affordable housing summit by azhttp

Nikki Ripley

Communication and Media Relations Director City of Tempe

480-350-8846

Tempe City Council hosts affordable housing summit

TEMPE, Ariz. – Tempe community members will gather Saturday, Oct. 20, for a

half-day summit on affordable housing that is meant to spur discussion and

solutions for this pressing need.

City Councilmember Shana Ellis will lead the forum, which takes place from

8:30 a.m. to noon at the Tempe Public Library’s lower level Program Room,

3500 S. Rural Rd. Ellis is Chair of the City Council’s Transportation and

Affordable Housing Committee, which also includes Vice Mayor Hut Hutson as a

member.

Councilmember Ellis will present a current picture of the city’s affordable

housing projects, policies and needs. The city’s non-profit and faith-based

partners also will present local affordable housing projects. A roundtable

discussion will solicit ideas for creating partnerships and pooling

resources to create a workable affordable housing solution in Tempe.



Elements invade Post Office windows by azhttp

TEMPE, Ariz. – “Element,” an exhibition inspired by the extravagant holiday

window displays in Macy’s and other New York City department stores, will be

on display from Oct. 19-Jan. 31 at the United States Post Office, 500 S.

Mill Ave. (5th Street & Mill Avenue).

Artists Nicole Royse (Tempe), Jeff Falk (Phoenix), Adil Rahee (Mesa) and

Manny Burruel (Glendale) have prepared elaborate window displays that

celebrate one of the following elements: air, fire, earth and water.

Water

Royse earned her Bachelors of Arts degree in Art History from Arizona State

University. She currently works on several research projects in the field of

art history.

Fire

Falk is a long-time active artist in Phoenix that has studied art at

Glendale Community College, Arizona State University and Phoenix College and

has shown his artwork in more than 200 exhibitions in venues across North

America.

Earth

Since moving to Arizona and becoming an American citizen, Rahee has shown at

the Arizona State University Art Museum, as well as at the January Solo

Exhibition at Shemer Art Center and Museum. He is currently earning his

Masters of Fine Arts degree in Ceramics at ASU.

Air

Burruel is a member of the Glendale Arts Commission and is a past member of

the Arizona Commission on the Arts. He was president of the Shemer Art

Center and Museum Associations Board of Directors and is a past vice

president and artist member of Movimiento Artistico del Rio Salado. His work

has been shown in countless exhibits throughout the Phoenix Metropolitan

area. His work has appeared in numerous publications, as well.

Information: Visit http://www.tempe.gov/arts/exhibitions/USPO.htm or call

Michelle Dock 480/350-2867.



TEMPE, Ariz. – “Mighty Manimal March.” by azhttp

TEMPE, Ariz. – “Mighty Manimal March,” the second of a two-part temporary,

shared-terrain public art exhibition was installed on Friday October 12

Friday on the ASU Gammage lawn, at the northeast corner of Mill Avenue and

Apache Boulevard.

Seattle artist Nicole Kistler, formerly of Tempe, will install a more than

160 commercially produced plastic, latex and fiberglass animal lawn

ornaments, such as deer, flamingoes and coyotes on the Gammage lawn. The

menagerie features 64 flamingoes, 30 penguins, five pelicans, seven iguanas

and lizards, two pythons, 10 chicks, a baby elephant named “Bessie,” 11 wild

boar, 20 rabbits, four squirrels, six reindeer and three bears. She intends

to arrange this “river” of animals so that they appear to be on a protest

march or leaving class together and chatting about the course material.

The installation will be on display through December (date pending).

Shared Terrain exhibitions are intended to explore the blurred territory and

shared history where the university meets the city. Pedestrians and

passengers of the thousands of vehicles that pass through this area can

receive a new perspective on the familiar territory and expand their

awareness of site-responsive artwork.

This exhibition furthers the arts district concept of Mill Avenue, which

begins at Gammage Auditorium and includes the Music Building, ASU Art Museum

and the Ceramics Research Center and several School of Art galleries.

Shared Terrain information:

http://herbergercollege.asu.edu/public_art/temporary/sharedterrain.html

Nicole Kistler information: www.nicolekistler.com

<http://www.nicolekistler.com/>



AWARD WINNING TEMPE FACILITY CELEBRATES GRAND OPENING by azhttp

TEMPE (October 11, 2007) – Please join us as we celebrate the

newest and “greenest” facility in the Valley Metro transit system.

The public is invited to view and tour the East Valley Bus Operations and

Maintenance Facility at 2050 W. Rio Salado Parkway and understand more about

what makes a building environmentally friendly at the grand opening on

October 22.

The event begins at 9 a.m. with a breakfast and facility tours

to follow at 10:30 a.m. Tempe Mayor Hugh Hallman and Scottsdale Mayor Mary

Manross will make remarks about the features of the facility at 9:30 a.m.

The facility was recently awarded the Valley Forward Association Award of

Merit for Buildings and Structures because of its innovative use of recycled

materials and use of local resources.

“In Tempe, we are working to create an economically, culturally

and environmentally sustainable community,” said Tempe Mayor Hugh Hallman.

“This new facility is a tangible representation of that commitment and of

our ability to work together to make that sustainable vision a reality.”

The cities of Tempe and Scottsdale, along with Valley Metro,

will be celebrating this new facility that contains sustainable elements

that help to protect and conserve the Earth’s natural resources. Tempe and

Scottsdale are actively supporting Leadership in Energy and Environmental

Design (LEED) certified buildings in their communities.

Scottsdale Mayor Mary Manross said, “I am particularly proud

that Scottsdale and Tempe have supported a goal of LEED certification, and

with a Gold certification submittal for the facility’s administration

building it proves outstanding dedication to this effort.”

The new facility will provide and enhance future transportation

services in the Valley. The 24-acre facility will house 250 buses and 600

employees and include more than 100,000 square feet of state-of-the-art

maintenance, fueling, bus wash and administrative “green” space. The

administration office will be submitted for LEED Gold certification and the

remainder of the project will be submitted for LEED Silver certification by

the U.S. Green Building Council.

Funding for the facility is a combination of Proposition 400

public transportation funds, local funds from Tempe and Scottsdale, and

federal funds. The event is free to the public.

Valley Metro/RPTA is an organization of 14 local governments

that provides or funds transit services to citizens in the greater Phoenix

metropolitan and surrounding areas. For more information about Valley Metro

public transit services, call Transit Information at (602) 253-5000; for

callers with TTY (602) 261-8208; or visit the Valley Metro website at

www.ValleyMetro.org <http://www.valleymetro.org/> . The ON THE MOVE logo

designates those transportation projects approved by voters in November

2004.



Tempe delegation to accept 100 Best award by quotes
October 6, 2007, 7:08 pm
Filed under: City of Tempe, City of Tempe News, Tempe, Tempe Arizona | Tags: , , , ,

Tempe delegation to accept 100 Best award

Outstanding programs and facilities win accolade for Tempe

Tempe, AZ – A Tempe delegation will accept the city’s second 100 Best Communities for Young People award in Washington, D.C., next week.

City Councilmembers Mark Mitchell and Onnie Shekerjian, along with Tempe Community Council Executive Director Kate Hanley, and Communities in Schools Director Lynette Stonefeld, will be in attendance at the America’s Promise Alliance National Forum on Youth Oct. 10-11 in Washington.

Earlier this year, Tempe learned it had been named – for the second year in a row – as one of the top communities in the nation for youth.

Hundreds of communities in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands applied to win the designation, which honors commitments to provide healthy, safe and caring environments for young people.

Founded in 2005 by General Colin Powell, America’s Promise looks for communities that fulfill the organization’s Five Promises: Caring Adults; Safe Places; Healthy Start; Effective Education; and Opportunities to Help Others. Powell and his wife, Alma, will attend the forum, along with hundreds of representatives from other winning communities.

The two-day forum is designed to allow representatives from the winning communities to exchange ideas and hear from national leaders on issues that impact children.

Tempe’s application for the 2007 award was possible because of the support of many partners, such as the Tempe Community Council, the East Valley Boys & Girls Club, KAET Channel 8, the Tempe Elementary School District and the Mountain Park Health Clinic, among others.

Tempe won the award, in part, because of the efforts of Tempe/Kyrene Communities In Schools (CIS), a collaboration of the City of Tempe, Tempe school districts and many businesses and nonprofits. CIS has opened nine family resource centers in high-poverty elementary schools, with the aim of supporting parents as they take part in their children’s education.

Other programs and initiatives that helped single out Tempe for this honor include: the Mayor’s Youth Advisory Commission, which gives young people a voice in local government; the city’s establishment of an adaptive recreation program to serve children with disabilities who wish to participate in Special Olympics; an advisory committee of local businesses that hire special education and at-risk students for after-school jobs; the Tempe Public Library’s Experience Corps project, which pairs retirees with students for tutoring; and the first community health clinic serving low-income residents.



Mars by azhttp

 
Heat-sensing ASU camera finds possible cave skylights on Mars volcano

TEMPE, Ariz. – A heat-sensitive camera designed at Arizona State University and flying on NASA’s Mars Odyssey orbiter has led a team of Mars geologists to find seven small, deep holes on the flanks of Arsia Mons, a giant volcano on Mars. The holes may be openings, called skylights, in the ceilings of underground caves. The discovery is announced in a scientific paper published recently in Geophysical Research Letters.
 
The team of scientists includes Philip Christensen of ASU, plus Glen Cushing and Tim Titus of the U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff, and Judson Wynne of Northern Arizona University. Cushing is the lead author on the paper.
 
Christensen, a Regents Professor of geological science in ASU’s School of Earth and Space Exploration, designed the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the instrument the team used to make the discovery. THEMIS has been photographing the Red Planet at five visual and 10 infrared wavelengths since February 2002.
 
Says Christensen, “THEMIS is the only heat-sensing imager currently orbiting Mars.” Temperature data was the key in spotting the potential cave skylights, he notes.
 
The features the team found are dark, nearly circular holes in the ground with diameters ranging from 100 to 250 meters (yards). The holes appear in images of Arsia Mons taken by Mars Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor orbiters. Located in the volcanic region of Tharsis, Arsia is one of the larger volcanoes on Mars, and like the rest of Tharsis, it has a heavy coating of dust.
 
“We examined the flanks of the volcano in nighttime infrared images, looking for temperature anomalies – warm spots,” explains Christensen. “Then when we re-examined the locations in daytime images, we saw the small, deep holes in the ground.”
 
Dusty surfaces, he says, become hot during the day, both on Earth and Mars. But at night, dust and sand give up heat quickly, becoming very cold shortly before sunrise. The holes, however, changed temperature by only two-thirds as much as the surface.
 
Says Christensen, “We saw that we had dark holes that are warm at night, but cool by day. The best way to explain that is to have a deep hole with vertical walls, so you’re looking at a rocky surface free from sand and dust.”
 
The team suggests that the deep holes on Arsia Mons probably formed as faults created stresses that opened spaces underground. Some of the holes are in line with strings of bowl-shaped pits where the surface has collapsed.
 
The observations have been discussed at meetings with other Mars scientists earlier this year, and they have prompted researchers using Mars Odyssey and NASA’s newer Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to search for other openings to underground spaces.
 
Christensen adds, “The temperature data is what really separated these unique holes from millions of run-of-the-mill craters, volcanic vents, and collapse pits.”