Phoenix Arizona


Biomedical Sciences at ASU by quotes

Bee researcher at Arizona State University is one of 20 new Pew Scholars in the biomedical sciences

TEMPE, Ariz.– It’s hard to imagine, for most of us, that the bees we see buzzing between strands of orange flowers of the desert mallow could potentially usher in a medical breakthrough. However, in the right hands, these insects best known for their banded coloration, social life and skills with pollination could some day be the key to advancements in biomedical neuroscience of aging – if Gro Amdam has her way, with support from The Pew Charitable Trusts.
 
Amdam, an assistant professor in Arizona State University’s School of Life Sciences who heads social insect studies in laboratories at both ASU and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences’ Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences, is one of only 20 researchers chosen this year to enter the Trusts’ exclusive rolls as a Pew Scholar in the biomedical sciences. About 150 eligible colleges across the nation were invited to submit a candidate for the award this year. Remarkably, it was the first year that Arizona State University was invited to participate and Amdam was the sole candidate put forward by ASU President Michael M. Crow.
 
“The focus of this award – biomedical sciences – is an evolving area of emphasis for ASU,” says Crow. “The fact that the award is going to a researcher using the honeybee as a biomedical model exemplifies the spirit of ASU unconstrained by disciplinary boundaries.”
 
Robert Page, founding director of ASU’s School of Life Sciences and Amdam’s oft-time collaborator in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, says he never had any doubt that the Pew Trusts would select Amdam, and that the award has special significance on several fronts: “This the first year that ASU was invited to nominate, so it marks our initiation as an institution into this select ’club.’ The fact that our faculty member was chosen also shows that ASU belongs in the club. Then, when you consider that this award is in the area of biomedical science and will support research using honeybees … it shows just how much the world of biology is changing and that comparative biology will be central even to the biomedical sciences.”
 
The Pew Charitable Trusts is composed of seven separate trusts established between 1948 and 1979 by the heirs of Joseph N. Pew, founder of the Sun Oil Company, and is driven by the power of knowledge to solve today’s most challenging problems. Pew applies a rigorous, analytical approach to improve public policy, inform the public and stimulate civic life. It partners with a diverse range of donors, public and private organizations and concerned citizens who share its commitment to fact-based solutions and goal-driven investments to improve society.



“The Pew Scholars are among America’s finest biomedical research entrepreneurs. They seek out and mine unexpected leads in a quest for knowledge that may one day lead to new medical treatments and save lives,” says Rebecca W. Rimel, president and chief executive office of The Pew Charitable Trusts.



As a Pew Scholar, Amdam will receive a $240,000 award over four years to help support her research.



Among past Pew Scholars are Nobel Prize winners, such as Craig Mello from the University of Massachusetts, who shared the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine with Stanford’s Andrew Fire for their development of the RNA interference (RNAi) technique. Amdam’s research will make use of RNAi to study genes implicated in plasticity of honeybee neuronal aging.


Of the award, Amdam says, “In the scholarly system of Norway, where I come from, such recognitions are very rare, nearly unheard of. This is a great honor for me.” She also notes, “The award gives me a unique opportunity to take my research at ASU into the field of neuroscience, and neurogerontology in particular.”
 
According to Amdam, her Pew project will join two lines of study that have never been coupled: the emerging field of honeybee comparative neurogerontology – in which Amdam has published the first work on plasticity of neuronal oxidative damage – and honeybee behavioral physiology, where cumulative data show that age-related cell damage can be reversed. Amdam has authored or coauthored publications in Nature, Public Library of Science Biology, Advances in Cancer Research, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Experimental Gerontology and Behavioral Brain Research in the past year, laying the foundation for this work. Her group has documented that social reversal, which triggers old bees (that usually forage outside of the hive) to revert to tasks normally performed by younger bees (that nurse larvae within the hive), is associated with reversal of several physiological markers of senescence. Her findings, and supporting findings from other groups, Amdam says, indicate that “behavioral reversal triggers a systemic response, one which translates into a unique cascade of cell repair in bees.” Preliminary data collected in her laboratory suggest that this cascade can include the central nervous system.
 
“If social reversal causes arrest or partial clearance of neuronal oxidative damage, my project funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts will establish the first model for neuronal oxidative remission,” Amdam notes.
 
Oxidative brain damage is a fundamental pathology in normal human aging and in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, and development of novel treatments has high priority in biomedical research, says Amdam. Although she describes this line of discovery as risky, “its prospective contribution is of considerable relevance for human health.” 
 

Advertisements


Arizona Public Service and GreenFuel Technologies Corp. Successfully Recycle Power Plant Flue Gases into Transportation-Grade Biodiesel and Ethanol by quotes

Arizona Public Service and GreenFuel

Technologies Corp. Successfully

Recycle Power Plant Flue Gases into

Transportation-Grade Biodiesel

and Ethanol

Algae Bioreactor System Connected Directly to Smokestack of APS Redhawk 1,040 Megawatt Power Plant Recycles Greenhouse Gases into Renewable Biofuels

Arizona Public Service Company (APS) and GreenFuel Technologies Corporation have announced that they have successfully recycled the carbon dioxide (CO2) from the stack gases of a power plant into transportation grade biofuels. The announcement was made at the Platts Global Energy Awards ceremonies today in New York. Using GreenFuels Emissions-to-Biofuels algae bioreactor system connected to APS 1,040 megawatt Redhawk power plant in Arlington, Arizonan, GreenFuel was able to create a carbon-rich algal biomass with sufficient quality and concentration of oils and starch content to be converted into transportation-grade biodiesel and ethanol.

This is the first time ever that algae biomass created on-site by direct connection to a commercial power plant has been successfully converted to both these biofuels, said Isaac Berzin, GreenFuels founder and Chief Technology Officer. The conversion and certification of the fuels were conducted by respected, independent laboratories.

GreenFuels Emissions-to-Biofuels technology uses safe, naturally occurring algae to recycle carbon dioxide from the stack gases of power plants and other commercial sources of continuous CO2 emissions. At the Redhawk Power Plant, specially designed pipes captured and transported the CO2 emissions coming out of the stack. The gas was then transferred to specialized containers holding hungry algae. Algae are unicellular plants and, like all plants, they divide and grow using the process known as photosynthesis. In the presence of sunlight, algae consume CO2.

We estimate that this process can absorb as much as 80 percent of CO2 emissions during the daytime at a natural gas fired power plant, said GreenFuel CEO Cary Bullock. Unlike typical agricultural biofuel feedstocks such as soybeans or corn which have a limited harvest window, algae multiply every hour can be harvested every day.

GreenFuel and APS have been conducting a field assessment program over the past 18 months, and have moved into the next phase of study with the construction of an Engineering Scale Unit that will be completed in first quarter of 2007. This project holds great promise as we look for ways to meet the energy needs of the second fastest growing state in the nation while maintaining a successful economy, quality lifestyle and healthy environment, said Ed Fox, APS Vice President of Communications, Environment and Safety.

About Arizona Public Service Company

APS, Arizonas largest and longest-serving electricity utility, serves about 1 million customers in 11 of the states 15 counties. With headquarters in Phoenix, APS is the largest subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corp. (NYSE: PNW)

About GreenFuel Technologies Corporation

With more than a dozen pending patents, GreenFuel Technologies Corporation is the leading developer of systems for recycling rich CO2 streams from power and/or manufacturing plant flue gases to produce biofuels such as biodiesel, ethanol or methane. The company, which was founded in 2001, is headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts.



Historic Phoenix Union High School Re-Opens as State-of-the-Art Biomedical Campus by quotes

Historic Phoenix Union High School Re-Opens as State-of-the-Art Biomedical Campus

The city of Phoenix in collaboration with the University of Arizona College of Medicine, the state of Arizona and Arizona State University opened the new Phoenix Biomedical Campus.

More here: Phoenix Biomedical Campus



Local Biotech GenoSensor Signs Exclusive Deal with German Life-Science Company BioCat. by quotes

Local Biotech GenoSensor Signs Exclusive Deal with German Life-Science Company BioCat.

Tempe, Arizona, USA              October 2, 2006
Tempe based GenoSensor Corporation officially launched its microRNA product line into the European market today by signing a distribution deal with German life science company BioCat GmbH.  The move was strategic for both parties, giving GenoSensor penetration into the vast life science and pharmaceutical markets in the European Union, while allowing BioCat to have exclusive distribution rights to the unique product line.  After watching GenoSensor grow during the past year, BioCat proposed the deal, realizing the international recognition GenoSensor’s products were receiving.   
 
 
About GenoSensor
GenoSensor is a privately held biotechnology company aiming to improve lives by providing genomic research products and services worldwide for gene _expression profiling and genotyping, biomarker discovery, target validation, therapeutic assessment, and other bioscience applications.  Major products include microRNA profiling packages, as well as custom dna-arrays for gene _expression and genotyping. 
About BioCat
BioCat GmbH provides innovative tools and services for research in molecular and cell biology. Products and services are provided by BioCat´s partners in the USA, Korea, Taiwan, Russia, Finnland and Germany. BioCat is committed to a dedicated customer service by providing application oriented solutions. www.biocat.com.de

Arizona Biotech
Biotech News