Phoenix Arizona


Mesa – City Portals by azhttp
October 3, 2007, 5:17 am
Filed under: Arizona, Arizona Technology, Awards, City of Mesa, Innovation, Mayor, Mesa, Technology | Tags: ,

Contact: Jessica Brodersen

Web Specialist

480.644.5035 Tel

jessica.brodersen@cityofmesa.org

Mesa was recently named as a finalist in the Best of the Web Awards for City Portals. In addition, the city won an honorable mention in the government internal category for the automated web application for PC cycle replacement.

The Best of the Web Award is a national program that recognizes the most innovative, user-friendly state and local government portals.

“We are extremely proud to have received this recognition from the Center for Digital Government not only this year but on numerous occasions in the past because it shows we are consistent with our efforts to increase our use of technology, which will improve the quality of life of our citizens,”

Mesa City Manager Chris Brady said. “The award recognizes the creativity, innovation and dedication of our employees who have truly made the City of Mesa tech savvy.”

The Center for Digital Government is a national research and advisory institute on information technology policies and best practices in state and local government. For more information about the Center, and to view the list of all award winners, visit the Web site at http://www.centerdigitalgov.com.

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Biomedical Sciences at ASU by quotes

Bee researcher at Arizona State University is one of 20 new Pew Scholars in the biomedical sciences

TEMPE, Ariz.– It’s hard to imagine, for most of us, that the bees we see buzzing between strands of orange flowers of the desert mallow could potentially usher in a medical breakthrough. However, in the right hands, these insects best known for their banded coloration, social life and skills with pollination could some day be the key to advancements in biomedical neuroscience of aging – if Gro Amdam has her way, with support from The Pew Charitable Trusts.
 
Amdam, an assistant professor in Arizona State University’s School of Life Sciences who heads social insect studies in laboratories at both ASU and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences’ Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences, is one of only 20 researchers chosen this year to enter the Trusts’ exclusive rolls as a Pew Scholar in the biomedical sciences. About 150 eligible colleges across the nation were invited to submit a candidate for the award this year. Remarkably, it was the first year that Arizona State University was invited to participate and Amdam was the sole candidate put forward by ASU President Michael M. Crow.
 
“The focus of this award – biomedical sciences – is an evolving area of emphasis for ASU,” says Crow. “The fact that the award is going to a researcher using the honeybee as a biomedical model exemplifies the spirit of ASU unconstrained by disciplinary boundaries.”
 
Robert Page, founding director of ASU’s School of Life Sciences and Amdam’s oft-time collaborator in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, says he never had any doubt that the Pew Trusts would select Amdam, and that the award has special significance on several fronts: “This the first year that ASU was invited to nominate, so it marks our initiation as an institution into this select ’club.’ The fact that our faculty member was chosen also shows that ASU belongs in the club. Then, when you consider that this award is in the area of biomedical science and will support research using honeybees … it shows just how much the world of biology is changing and that comparative biology will be central even to the biomedical sciences.”
 
The Pew Charitable Trusts is composed of seven separate trusts established between 1948 and 1979 by the heirs of Joseph N. Pew, founder of the Sun Oil Company, and is driven by the power of knowledge to solve today’s most challenging problems. Pew applies a rigorous, analytical approach to improve public policy, inform the public and stimulate civic life. It partners with a diverse range of donors, public and private organizations and concerned citizens who share its commitment to fact-based solutions and goal-driven investments to improve society.



“The Pew Scholars are among America’s finest biomedical research entrepreneurs. They seek out and mine unexpected leads in a quest for knowledge that may one day lead to new medical treatments and save lives,” says Rebecca W. Rimel, president and chief executive office of The Pew Charitable Trusts.



As a Pew Scholar, Amdam will receive a $240,000 award over four years to help support her research.



Among past Pew Scholars are Nobel Prize winners, such as Craig Mello from the University of Massachusetts, who shared the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine with Stanford’s Andrew Fire for their development of the RNA interference (RNAi) technique. Amdam’s research will make use of RNAi to study genes implicated in plasticity of honeybee neuronal aging.


Of the award, Amdam says, “In the scholarly system of Norway, where I come from, such recognitions are very rare, nearly unheard of. This is a great honor for me.” She also notes, “The award gives me a unique opportunity to take my research at ASU into the field of neuroscience, and neurogerontology in particular.”
 
According to Amdam, her Pew project will join two lines of study that have never been coupled: the emerging field of honeybee comparative neurogerontology – in which Amdam has published the first work on plasticity of neuronal oxidative damage – and honeybee behavioral physiology, where cumulative data show that age-related cell damage can be reversed. Amdam has authored or coauthored publications in Nature, Public Library of Science Biology, Advances in Cancer Research, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Experimental Gerontology and Behavioral Brain Research in the past year, laying the foundation for this work. Her group has documented that social reversal, which triggers old bees (that usually forage outside of the hive) to revert to tasks normally performed by younger bees (that nurse larvae within the hive), is associated with reversal of several physiological markers of senescence. Her findings, and supporting findings from other groups, Amdam says, indicate that “behavioral reversal triggers a systemic response, one which translates into a unique cascade of cell repair in bees.” Preliminary data collected in her laboratory suggest that this cascade can include the central nervous system.
 
“If social reversal causes arrest or partial clearance of neuronal oxidative damage, my project funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts will establish the first model for neuronal oxidative remission,” Amdam notes.
 
Oxidative brain damage is a fundamental pathology in normal human aging and in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, and development of novel treatments has high priority in biomedical research, says Amdam. Although she describes this line of discovery as risky, “its prospective contribution is of considerable relevance for human health.” 
 



Women of the United Farm Workers Honored at Cesar Chavez Luncheon by quotes

 Women of the United Farm Workers Honored at Cesar Chavez Luncheon

The sixth annual Cesar E. Chavez luncheon celebration, “Honoring Women of the Movement: Continuing the Legacy,” will be from 11:50 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, March 22, at the Phoenix Convention Center West Building, Third Floor, 100 N. Third St. Doors open at 11 a.m.

Dolores Huerta, co-founder of the United Farmer Workers of America, will be the keynote luncheon speaker. She will discuss her role in organizing the farm workers and as an advocate for farm worker’s rights. She also will highlight the contribution of the thousands of women who were part of forming the farm labor movement.

“We are excited Dolores will be with us for this special occasion to pay a special tribute to Arizona women who were involved in the farm worker labor civil rights movement in Phoenix from the mid-60s to early 70s,” said Francisca Montoya, Arizona regional director of the Cesar E. Chavez Foundation. “These women participated in the marches, grape boycott and assisted with Cesar’s fast in 1972.”

Paul Chavez, son of Cesar Chavez and president of the National Farm Workers Service Center, will speak on the current situation of thousands of farm workers out of work as a result of the devastating freeze this winter. Gov. Janet Napolitano and Mayor Phil Gordon also will speak.

The luncheon program will feature a special film presentation of teachers and students involved in the “Educating the Heart” school program in Arizona. The musical group Cascabel will perform several songs including one dedicated to Chavez.

The luncheon acknowledges the accomplishments of Chavez, a civil rights activist, farm worker, labor leader and community crusader for nonviolent social change. Other events will be held during the month of March throughout the Valley to honor Chavez. View the Cesar Chavez Day of Service and Learning 2007 Calendar of Events.

Sponsored by the city of Phoenix and the Cesar E. Chavez Foundation, this annual event will pay tribute to Chavez by recognizing his birthday as a holiday for city employees on March 30. (The official holiday is Saturday, March 31.)

Southwest Ambulance is the premier “Si Se Puede” sponsor contributing $50,000 along with other major sponsors including Maricopa County Community College District, PMT Ambulance, UFCW, Phoenix College and the Arizona Lottery. Media sponsors are KPNX-TV, The Arizona Republic, La Voz and azcentral.com.

Tickets are $85 per person, $850 for government/nonprofit tables and $1,500 for corporate tables. For more information about the event or to purchase tickets, call 602-272-0080, extension 3.



ASU’s Jason Burke To Receive Post-Graduate Scholarship by quotes
January 27, 2007, 4:39 pm
Filed under: Arizona, Arizona State University, ASU, Awards | Tags: , , , ,

ASU’s Jason Burke To Receive Post-Graduate Scholarship
National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame Honors Burke

Jason Burke, a long snapper on the 2006 Arizona State University football team, is the 2007 recipient of a postgraduate scholarship presented annually by the Valley of the Sun Chapter of the National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame, Chapter Executive Director Dan Manucci announced Friday.
 
Burke and several local high school football student-athletes will be honored at the Chapter’s annual Scholarship Banquet on Saturday, February 24 at 6:30 p.m. at the Scottsdale Hilton Resort, 6333 North Scottsdale Road. For more information regarding the banquet contact Dan Manucci at 480-838-2046.
 
The consummate Sun Devil, Burke played in all 49 games during the 2003-06 seasons, joining kicker Jesse Ainsworth and defensive tackle Jordan Hill as the only Sun Devils on the 2006 roster to do so.  Burke was a steady long snapper who made only one bad snap during his four-year career.  A highly acclaimed student who earned Pacific-10 Conference All-Academic honors four times during his career, including first-team honors in 2005 and 2006.  He was an integral member of ASU’s special teams units that used the services of a total of four punters during the 2003-06 seasons.
 
In 2006 Burke played in all 13 games as ASU’s long snapper while earning first-team Pac-10 All-Academic honors for the second consecutive season, posting a 3.9 GPA studying finance and marketing, the second-highest grade point average among first-team members. He was the snapper for kicker Jesse Ainsworth, who finished the season successfully converting a Pac-10 record 160 consecutive extra points, which dates back to the 2003 season.  He snapped to punter Jonathan Johnson, whose 37.2-yard net punting average was a 6.9-yard increase from ASU’s average in 2005, the greatest improvement in the Pac-10.  Burke was recognized as a Hard Hat Player for his work in ASU’s preseason winter strength and conditioning program.
 
In 2005 Burke served as the team’s long snapper in all 12 games.  He participated in every game despite being hampered by nagging injuries and earned first-team Pac-10 All-Academic honors with a 3.9 GPA.
 
In 2004 he handled ASU’s long snapping duties in all 12 games. He snapped to punter Chris MacDonald who earned Freshman All-America honors after finishing third in the Pac-10 and 15th in the nation at 43.1 yards per punt. He was a second-team Pac-10 All-Academic selection.  Burke also earned first-team ESPN the Magazine Academic All-District VIII honors.  He shared the team’s Clyde B. Smith Academic Award with Andrew Carnahan. Burke played in all 12 games at long snapper in 2003 and earned second-team Pac-10 All-Academic honors.  He snapped to honorable mention All-Pac-10 performer Tim Parker who finished 20th in the nation and third in the Pac-10 at 43.4 yards per punt.
 
A 2002 graduate of Mountain Ridge High School in Glendale Burke was named first-team all-region at center in 2001. He earned the U.S. Marine Corps Distinguished Athlete Award in 2002 and also earned the National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame Scholar-Athlete Award in 2002. Burke lettered in football one year and was coached by Steve Belles. A finance major, Burkes parents are Paul (independent contractor) and Marie (executive assistant) of Glendale.
 
ASUs National Football Foundation Hall of Fame Scholar-Athletes
 
2007    Jason Burke
2006    Chad Christensen
2005    Grayling Love
2004    Skyler Fulton
2003    Mike Barth
2002    Nick Murphy
2001    Mike Aguirre
1997    Damien Richardson
1996    Kirk Robertson
1995    Justin Dragoo
1993    Toby Mills
1992    Adam Brass
1990    Drew Metcalfe
1989    Mark Tingstad
1978    Chris Mott
1966    Ken Dyer



WWII TUSKEGEE AIRMEN TRIBUTE AT SKY HARBOR INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT by quotes

WWII TUSKEGEE AIRMEN TRIBUTE AT SKY HARBOR INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

The stage is set for Captain Lee Owens of Phoenix to make history
during a tribute flight to the famed Tuskegee Airmen in the spring of
2007.  Capt. Owens will fly a single engine plane from the Lincoln J.
Ragsdale Terminal at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport across
America, over the Atlantic and around the globe before returning home
to Phoenix sometime in May.



Nominations Sought for Diversity Awards by quotes
November 3, 2006, 11:34 pm
Filed under: Arizona, Awards, City of Tempe, City of Tempe News, Tempe | Tags: ,

Nominations Sought for Diversity Awards

 

            Tempe Human Relations Commission, together with the City of
Tempe, is seeking nominations for its Ninth Annual Diversity Awards.
Award winners will be recognized at Tempe’s Martin Luther King, Jr.
Celebration, “Together We’re Better,” Diversity Awards Brunch, on
Monday, January 15, 2007 at the Tempe Buttes Resort.

            To be eligible, nominees must live, work, or volunteer in
the City of Tempe and demonstrate a commitment to honoring and
celebrating diversity in the Tempe community.  A new award category,
“Diversity Supplier Award,” has been added this year.  Nominees for this
award do not have the residency requirement; however they must have done
business with the City of Tempe within the calendar year 2006.  Six
nominating categories are offered:

        Individual Adult
Community Group / Organization

        Educational Organization                                Business

        Individual Youth (18 years and younger)       Diversity Supplier
Award

       

            Nominations must be received no later than Wednesday,
December 13, 2006, at 5 p.m.  Nominees may not currently be serving as a
Tempe elected official or a Tempe Human Relation Commissioner.
Nomination information should be sent to: City of Tempe, c/o Ginny
Belousek, 31 E. Fifth Street, Tempe, AZ 85281, or faxed to 480/350-2907.
To request a nomination form or for ticket information to attend the
Diversity Awards Brunch, please call (480) 350-8979.  An online
nomination form is also available at www.tempe.gov/diversity.



Southeast Asian film series continues by quotes

Southeast Asian film series continues

 

TEMPE, Ariz. – The Southeast Asian Refugee Film series returns at 6 p.m.
on Thursday with “The Story of Vinh,” in the Historical Museum lobby,
809 E. Southern Ave. (southwest corner of Rural Road and Southern
Avenue).

 

The film features the tale of Vinh Dinh, the abandoned child of a United
States serviceman and a Vietnamese mother, who, speaking no English,
arrives in America to pursue the American Dream.

 

The Southeast Asian Film Series is being presented as a companion piece
to the exhibit, “A Proud Journey Home: Cambodian, Laotian and Vietnamese
Communities in Arizona,” currently showing in the Tempe Historical
Museum gallery.

 

A moderator will lead a discussion and regional refreshments will be
served. The series is being presented in partnership with Community
Outreach and Advocacy for Refugees (COAR), an organization whose mission
is to assist refugees in adjusting to their new life in Arizona.

 

Remaining schedule

Nov. 9 – “A Refugee and Me,” The documentary of Twai Thongdee, a Burmese
refugee living in Thailand, who searches for a Thai identification card
so he can live and work freely without fear of imprisonment.

 

Nov. 16 – “Being Hmong Means Being Free,” The documentary of the culture
and traditions of a Hmong refugee community in Wisconsin and the
dramatic changes the community undergoes over the span of a decade.

 

Information: visit http://www.tempe.gov/museum/events.htm or call
480/350-5100.
By the Way – BOTDA has an Asian film related winner today.